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Locals helping victims of Harvey

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Photo above: Luke Fairchild, a butcher with Island’s Meat Market on Lady’s Island, stacks some of the donated items destined for flood victims in Houston. Photos by Bob Sofaly.

Angel Hayes, left, a phlebotomist with OneBlood, takes out the needle from the arm of Rett Bullard of Beaufort during a blood drive for the flood victims in Houston. Hayes said OneBlood collects blood for local hospitals but is also sending some to hospitals in Houston.
Angel Hayes, left, a phlebotomist with OneBlood, takes out the needle from the arm of Rett Bullard of Beaufort during a blood drive for the flood victims in Houston. Hayes said OneBlood collects blood for local hospitals but is also sending some to hospitals in Houston.

By Bob Sofaly and Sally Mahan

(Editor’s note: The Island News goes to press on Tuesday, so we didn’t have enough information to let our readers know what to expect regarding Hurricane Irma and its potential impact. Additionally, contact the organizations mentioned in this story before dropping off items to make sure they are still accepting donations.) 

The horror of Hurricane Harvey has brought out the best in folks throughout Northern Beaufort County.

From collections of clothing and toys to donating money to giving blood, people throughout the area are looking for ways to help.

SugarBelle, a boutique on Boundary Street, has been collecting bottled water, hygiene products and baby formula, in addition to other donations, and is working with Samaritan’s Purse to help distribute the items. 

Samaritan’s Purse is a nondenominational evangelical Christian organization providing spiritual and physical aid to hurting people around the world. Since 1970, Samaritan’s Purse has helped meet needs of people who are victims of war, poverty, natural disasters, disease and famine.

“We were helped (after Hurricane Matthew),” said Cherimie Crane Weatherford of SugarBelle. “We have to help.”

SugarBelle can be reached at 843-379-4141.

Meanwhile, Angel Hayes, a phlebotomist with OneBlood, said the organization collects blood for local hospitals but is also sending some to hospitals in Houston.

Luke Fairchild, a butcher with Island’s Meat Market on Lady’s Island, is collecting items such as baby and pet supplies, toiletries and nonperishable food for the flood victims.

Those items will be brought to Love House Ministries for storage until they are sent to Texas. Island’s Meat Market is one of the drop-off points for donations. It is accepting donations at the market at 136 Sea Island Parkway from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Call 843-525-6162.

Other donation drop-off locations include Love House Ministries at 423 Parris Island Gateway, which is accepting donations from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday (843-524-5683); and Bubba’s Lowcountry Collectibles at 463 Parris Island Gateway, which is accepting donations from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday (843-525-1130). 

Love House Ministries said they are accepting any type of toiletries, nonperishable food, clothing, water, cat and dog food, diapers, wipes, batteries, bleach, plastic gloves, trash bags, sock and underwear, blankets and sleeping bags, baby bottles and medical supplies.

Another group taking donations is Beaufort Restaurants United. 

“We are arranging to fill an 18-wheeler full of supplies to show our support for the victims of Hurricane Harvey,” according to their flyer. “Not quite a year ago we went through similar conditions and we want to give back.

“Anything you can spare will help. Clothes, water, food, blankets, anything that can help those displaced.”

Donation dropoff locations include Piace Pizza on Lady’s Island (843-379-2237), Brody’s Bar and Grill in Beaufort (843-524-2500), The Tavern in Royal Pines (843-522-9700), Boondocks on St. Helena Island (843-838-0821) and The Kitchen catering in Beaufort (843-929-8643).

Readers should check with these groups and businesses to make sure they’re still accepting donations.

Visit www.redcross.org for locations for blood drives and information on monetary donations.

Beware of fraudulent charities

In response to the devastation from Hurricane Harvey, many South Carolinians are searching for ways to help victims. 

The SC Department of Consumer Affairs is advising consumers to be on the lookout for fake charities. Here are a few tips to ensure donations get to those in need:

• Seek out a charity. Be cautious of groups that approach you. Obtain information on a particular charity by visiting the SC Secretary of State’s website at www.sos.sc.gov/Public_Charities or by calling 803-734-1790.

• Donate to well-known charities. Watch out for charities that have sprung up overnight. Do not assume a charity is legitimate based on its name. Some phony charities use names similar to those of respected, legitimate organizations.

• Know who’s calling. During a call, a professional solicitor must disclose that they are a paid solicitor, the name, location and purpose of the charity, the registered and the true name of the professional fundraising organization for which they work. 

• Know where the money is going. Ask what percentage of your contribution goes to the charitable cause. Find out their mission and history. Don’t be afraid to ask for details in writing.

• Do not provide personal or financial information to cold callers. This includes your Social Security number, credit card and bank account numbers. Scam artists can use this information to commit fraud. When in doubt, hang up.

• Do not give or send cash. For security and tax record purposes, contribute by check or credit card. Write the official name of the charity on your check.

Michael Powell, team leader for OneBlood, handles some of the 14 pints of blood taken on Sept. 1. The blood will be divided between local hospitals and hospitals in Houston.
Michael Powell, team leader for OneBlood, handles some of the 14 pints of blood taken on Sept. 1. The blood will be divided between local hospitals and hospitals in Houston.

Teresa Roberts, left, and Portia Siler sort through some of the clothing and toilet articles donated for flood victims in Houston. Roberts said they opted not to work through any national organization. They instead planned on renting a tractor-trailer and driving to Houston. The donations will then be distributed by members of their organization.
Teresa Roberts, left, and Portia Siler sort through some of the clothing and toilet articles donated for flood victims in Houston. Roberts said they opted not to work through any national organization. They instead planned on renting a tractor-trailer and driving to Houston. The donations will then be distributed by members of their organization.
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