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School briefs for October 6th-12th

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The Low Country Ladies of SC recently awarded scholarships to high school seniors from Beaufort, Hampton, Jasper and Colleton counties. Funds were raised through sponsors, community donations and an annual Scholarship Luncheon and Fashion Show. The Hubert and Jessie Tyler Charitable Fund and the Bargain Box of Hilton Head were among the generous donors. Seated from left are Etta Mann, Rosalind Hollis, Veronica Miller, Paula Gant and Celia Price. Standing are Kimberly Brown, Jessie Tyler, Esther Black, Eleanor Hazel, Sandra Walker, Vermelle Matthews, Cheryl Dopson, Marie Lewis and Ervena Faulker.
The Low Country Ladies of SC recently awarded scholarships to high school seniors from Beaufort, Hampton, Jasper and Colleton counties. Funds were raised through sponsors, community donations and an annual Scholarship Luncheon and Fashion Show. The Hubert and Jessie Tyler Charitable Fund and the Bargain Box of Hilton Head were among the generous donors. Seated from left are Etta Mann, Rosalind Hollis, Veronica Miller, Paula Gant and Celia Price. Standing are Kimberly Brown, Jessie Tyler, Esther Black, Eleanor Hazel, Sandra Walker, Vermelle Matthews, Cheryl Dopson, Marie Lewis and Ervena Faulker.

Local students enroll at USC Upstate

The following students have enrolled at USC Upstate for fall semester: Khadijah Badger, Javasia Brown, Tiara Cooper, James Duke, Jordan Field, Jacilyn Frazier, Samuel Green, Amanda Holley, Sydni McDonald, Matthew Morgan, Walicia Patterson, Paris Smith, Sarah Wilson and Chelsea Witter, all of Beaufort; Tatiana Barber, of Okatie; and Aqeela Aiken, Sasha-Gaye Brown, Tess Brown, Victoria Brown, Selice Daley, Dominique Lindsey, Jaquille Mosley, Bobbie Sanchez, James Tisdale and Terryann Tracey, all of Bluffton.

Two additional schools earn STEM certification

Two additional Beaufort County School district schools have earned prestigious certifications in science, technology, engineering and mathematics instruction following on-site visits by outside review teams.

Okatie Elementary School and River Ridge Academy are the newest district schools to earn STEM Certification from AdvancED, a nonprofit organization that provides on-site external reviews of PreK-12 schools and school systems around the world.

Four district schools earned AdvancED STEM certification in 2015:  Beaufort Elementary, Michael C. Riley Elementary and Pritchardville Elementary schools and Lady’s Island Middle School.

“This latest news means that the district’s perfect record is intact,” said Superintendent Jeff Moss. “All six schools that have sought STEM certification have achieved it, and that’s a powerful affirmation of the quality of their instruction and the dedication of their staffs.”

Darrell Barringer, AdvancED’s state director, said that six of South Carolina’s 17 current STEM-certified schools are in Beaufort County, twice the number of schools in any other district.

“We’re very pleased with Beaufort County’s commitment to quality STEM instruction,” Barringer said.

AdvancED touts its STEM Certification as “the first internationally recognized mark of quality for STEM schools and programs, signaling the growing emphasis placed on STEM education by educators, politicians and business leaders around the world.”

AdvancED requires applying schools to meet its STEM Certification standards as reflected by their performance across 11 rigorous indicators.

AdvancED reviewers examine each school’s evidence of quality STEM education that the schools provided to the review team beforehand, and on-site classroom observations then focus on identifying student engagement and collaboration in the
learning process.

Holy Trinity raises $650,000 in campaign

holy-trinity

Administrators, faculty, staff and parents at Holy Trinity Classical Christian School are celebrating after the school’s first annual fundraising campaign ended in a blaze  of glory.

The 2015-2016 campaign, “Love to Learn, Learn to Love,” raised more than $650,000 to continue the school’s mission of providing a classical Christian education to elementary, middle and high school students.

The annual fund campaign is the tangible manifestation of a decision made by the Holy Trinity board of trustees to support families by adopting a faith-based
tuition policy.

While other private schools typically rely on tuition to cover a significant percentage of their operating costs, Holy Trinity chose another path. Under its 40/60 model, tuition covers 60 percent of all operating costs, and donors contribute the remaining 40 percent to help sustain the school’s viability.

The term “faith-based” refers to the board’s belief that God will provide to enable the school to continue doing His work.

In late May, after receiving a $100,000 disbursement from the Farrell & Elizabeth Runyan endowment, the school was still shy of reaching its goal of $651,500. This caused the leadership of the school to press into God through prayer. And then an unexpected gift of $50,000 arrived the last week of school, pushing the grand total to $652,768.84.

“We at Holy Trinity continue to be amazed at how God continues to provide for our school,” said the Rev. Chad E. Lawrence, the school headmaster. “We are so grateful for the support we have received from generous individuals, many of whom don’t even have a child in the school.”

The school has recently commenced its 2016-2017 annual fund campaign with an even larger goal of $791,600 to accommodate for the school’s rapid growth.

Holy Trinity’s 275 students in grades preschool through nine study Latin, the great works of poetry, literature, art, music, history, phonics and mathematics, all within the framework of a Christ-centered learning environment.

“When we started the school, I knew it would have an impact on the students,” said Lawrence. “What I didn’t realize is how it would change entire families. This is precisely why it’s so important that we keep tuition within reach for those who passionately desire a classical Christian education for their children.”

Student of the Week – September 29th

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jamari-young

Welcome to our newest weekly feature: Student of the Week, which gives us an opportunity to shine the light on some of the great kids in our local schools.

This week’s Student of the Week is seventh-grader Jamari Young of Beaufort Middle School. He was nominated by his principal, Carole Ingram, who said, “Jamari is one of those students that is friendly and always smiling, sharing kindness with all he encounters throughout his day, whether a longtime friend, a new acquaintance or a stranger.  Jamari’s kindness and friendship with a new student have been noteworthy. He has made a mark that now is positively imitated by his peers. His behavior exemplifies friendship and kindness.”

Jamari took some time recently to answer some questions:

Q: What’s your favorite subject and why?

A: My favorite subject is English/Language Arts. It’s fun for me because I love to write.

Q: What are some of your accomplishments?

A: One of my accomplishments is making the TriM Honors Choir.

Q: What clubs and activities are you involved in?

A: I’m in chorus and in the school’s production of “The Lion King.”

Q: Who do you admire and why?

A: I admire Tre’ Melvin because he is inspiration.

Q: What’s your favorite thing to do outside of school? 

A: Outside of school I love to sing and dance.

Q: What’s your favorite movie?

A: My favorite movie is “The Purge.”

Q: What’s your favorite TV show?

A: My favorite TV show is “Love & Hip Hop Atlanta.”

Q: What’s your favorite music?

A: My favorite music is R&B and hip hop.

School briefs for September 29th-October 5th

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Top photo: Beaufort Academy freshman Cal Harvey, son of Bert and Juliet Harvey, was named the recipient of the third annual Emerging Leader Scholarship. The ELS scholarship was designed by an anonymous donor to identify and support a rising ninth-grade student throughout their upper school tenure at BA. Eighth-graders from all over Beaufort County were invited to apply. Its unique focus is to cultivate the leadership skills of the recipients, with the intent that these students will both show academic prowess as well as participate in leadership roles at BA and in the community. From left are BA Headmaster Stephen Schools, Juliet Harvey, Cal Harvey and Bert Harvey.

Rosemary Wells, author and illustrator of the popular children’s series “Max & Ruby,” selected Cross Schools as the first stop in a tour to promote her latest book, “Hand in Hand.” The event featured a meet-and-greet and book signing, as well as a Young Artists Workshop for grades K-4, and a Young Writers Workshop for grades 5-8. Cross Schools is an independent Christian school in Bluffton serving children from 18 months through eighth grade. Wells is shown here with kindergartener Zoe Vermilyea, daughter of Kate and Jody Vermilyea.
Rosemary Wells, author and illustrator of the popular children’s series “Max & Ruby,” selected Cross Schools as the first stop in a tour to promote her latest book, “Hand in Hand.” The event featured a meet-and-greet and book signing, as well as a Young Artists Workshop for grades K-4, and a Young Writers Workshop for grades 5-8. Cross Schools is an independent Christian school in Bluffton serving children from 18 months through eighth grade. Wells is shown here with kindergartener Zoe Vermilyea, daughter of Kate and Jody Vermilyea.
The Bluffton Rotary awarded two scholarships for student involvement in the USCB Rotaract Club at its Sept. 14 meeting. Mahogany Hickman and Mariah Rogers were honored for their involvement as president and vice president of the Rotaract club at USCB. Rotaract is the college division of Rotary International.  Both students were leaders in the development of the Rotaract Club at USCB, which is committed to community service.
The Bluffton Rotary awarded two scholarships for student involvement in the USCB Rotaract Club at its Sept. 14 meeting. Mahogany Hickman and Mariah Rogers were honored for their involvement as president and vice president of the Rotaract club at USCB. Rotaract is the college division of Rotary International. Both students were leaders in the development of the Rotaract Club at USCB, which is committed to community service.

Riverview Charter holds ribbon-cutting

Riverview Charter School celebrated its new middle school building and newly renovated cafeteria on Sept. 27 with a ribbon-cutting ceremony at the school at 81 Savannah Highway in Beaufort. The event was hosted by the Beaufort Regional Chamber of Commerce. An open house for students and their families took place following the ribbon-cutting ceremony.

Riverview Charter School opened on Aug. 17, 2009. It is a free public school open to all residents of Beaufort County, and it was the first charter school to open in Beaufort County. It is sponsored by the Beaufort County School District. There is no tuition fee and no pre-admission testing or interviewing required for prospective students. Riverview Charter School has expanded by one grade per year, and it now serves K-8 students. The maximum class size is 19 students. Applications for the following school year are accepted from Jan. 1-31 of the preceding school year, and available seats are filled through a public lottery.

For more information, visit www.beaufortchamber.org or call 843-525-8500.

Superintendent to hold town hall meetings

Parents and community members will have several opportunities to meet with Beaufort County School District Superintendent Jeff Moss. Moss holds a cycle of informal town hall meetings twice each year with parents and citizens in each of the district’s “clusters” of schools.

“With the beginning of a new school year as well as with encouraging student achievement results being released this fall, there’s a lot to celebrate and discuss,” Moss said. “The opportunity to connect with parents and community members is something I truly value.”

The town hall meetings for the fall semester will be held at 6 p.m. at each of the following schools:

• Thursday, Sept. 29, at Whale Branch Early College High School
• Thursday, Oct. 6, at Beaufort High School
• Monday, Oct. 10, at May River High School
• Monday, Oct. 24, at Battery Creek High School (to include Islands Academy)

The fall town hall meeting for the Bluffton cluster will be the Oct. 10 event at May River High; the spring town hall meeting for the cluster will be at Bluffton High.

Teachers celebrated at annual event

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Martha Hartley, CFO of Hitlon Head Cadillac Buick GMC, presented Teacher of the Year Elizabeth MacMurray with $5,000 that could be used as a gift or applied to the purchase of a vehicle from the dealership.
Martha Hartley, CFO of Hitlon Head Cadillac Buick GMC, presented Teacher of the Year Elizabeth MacMurray with $5,000 that could be used as a gift or applied to the purchase of a vehicle from the dealership.

By Kat Walsh

Talk about a tough competition.

In a room filled with Teachers of the Year – one from each building in the school district – a roomful of those who daily go above and beyond, the task was to pick the winner from the top five finalists to become Beaufort County’s 2016-17 District Teacher of the Year.

“It is not an easy decision, for we are in a roomful of winners,” said Superintendent Jeff Moss.

In listing the district’s academic achievements and successes, Moss said that just doesn’t happen without hard work and dedication. “The No. 1 reason we are successful is you.”

Portraits of Success, the theme of the celebration, were read for each of the five finalists: Lawrence Anderson, of Mossy Oaks Elementary School; Bebe Cifaldi, of Hilton Head School for the Creative Arts; Kelly Goudy, of Robert Smalls International Academy; Elizabeth MacMurray, of Hilton Head Island High; and Jennifer Stoddard, of Beaufort Middle School.

As with most in their profession, these finalists do so much more than just “teach.”

Often arriving before sunrise and leaving after sunset, no one works a student school day. They get to know their students and their stories. To their colleagues, they are team leaders and mentors. To their students, they are cheerleaders, listeners, tough-love givers and friends. For their students, they are challengers and champions.

“They are each Teacher of the Year every year,” said Moss, before announcing Elizabeth MacMurray as the 2016-17 District Teacher of the Year.

“I’ll start with ‘Wow!’” said MacMurray, who has been in the classroom since 1982. “I am truly humbled and privileged to be a teacher in the Beaufort County School District.”

MacMurray, the daughter of two teachers and mother of one, said that teaching is in her blood. “If scientists can’t find it in my DNA, then psychologists should study my environment to debate whether nature or nurture influences destiny.”

Amanda O’Nan, principal at Hilton Head Island High, described MacMurray as a teacher she would want her own children to have.

“She has a heart of gold and that’s why our students gravitate to her. Magic happens in her classroom.”

Known as a role model for a teacher in any school setting, MacMurray stressed that teachers needed to stand by one another.

“We must support each other because it is a hard job. We do sacrifice. But when you make that sacrifice and you get to look at kids and see the great things that they can accomplish – wow.”

In presenting MacMurray with a $1,000 grant from the Foundation for Educational Excellence for innovative instruction, Jackie Rosswurm acknowledged how amazing it was to sit in a room with a group of teachers who devote their lives to what is good for students.

But, she said that it also was quite a difficult act to follow: “When you come up to speak after a group of children and adults have spoken about the Teacher of the Year finalists, and then the actual teacher of the year comes up to speak, please!”

In the closing remarks, Carizma Brown, of BCSD communications, spoke about her experience videotaping the students in each finalists’ classroom.

“I thought I was there to just shoot a few videos, and I wound up inspired. You all inspired me so much. And I cannot thank you enough for what you do every day, and every night for our students.”

School briefs for September 22nd-28th

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Colleges make pitches to over 2,500 students

Seventy-five colleges and universities made sales pitches to Beaufort County public and private high school juniors and seniors recently at a college fair that drew more than 2,500 students to Bluffton High School.

Schools advertising their programs to students ranged from small private colleges to large public universities.

Local schools included the University of South Carolina Beaufort and the Technical College of the Lowcountry, while out-of-state schools included Florida State, Ohio State and Alabama.

Students visited booths staffed by college and university representatives who answered students’ questions about academic offerings, tuition costs and scholarship opportunities.

Superintendent Jeff Moss said that the annual college fair focuses students on preparing for new goals after they graduate from high school.

“We know that the best careers for our students will require more education beyond high school,” Moss said.  “Our annual college fair points students in that direction, and it’s also exciting for them to see so many colleges and universities competing for their attention.”

The Citadel welcomes the Class of 2020

The Citadel officially welcomed the Class of 2020. The incoming class of over 800 new cadets and students represents 36 states and seven foreign countries.

The following cadets matriculated as part of The Citadel’s Class of 2020, the largest recorded freshman class in the history of the college: Thomas Henderson, Logan Hofmann, John Inglis, David Lentz, Alec Melville and Evan Parry, all of Beaufort; and Bridgette Beach, Carmen Jones, Jessica Phillips, Maria Urso, Matthew Seelman, Max Brown, Maxine Chisolm and Melissa Lavery, all of Bluffton.

In other Citadel news, the Band Company has been awarded the Commandant’s Cup for the 2015-16 school year.

Christopher Wallace, of Beaufort, was among 59 other cadets in Band Company recognized for their performance during parade and squad drill.

Additionally, Carli Cline and Forrest Kimbrell, both of Beaufort, were part of the company awarded the 2016 President’s Cup. It is awarded annually to the cadet company that establishes the highest combined score in academic achievement, military performance, extracurricular participation and class retention.

School briefs for September 15th-21st

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lawrence

Top photo: From left are Robinson award winner Lawrence Lindsay’s parents and brother, Shannon, William and Anne Lindsay, Lawrence Lindsay, T. Reynolds Robinson’s father and brother, Bill Robinson and Clark Robinson, and BA Headmaster Stephen Schools.

BA student wins Robinson award

Beaufort Academy sophomore Lawrence Lindsay was recently named as the recipient of the 2016 T. Reynolds Robinson Scholarship.

This scholarship has been awarded annually at BA since 1989 – the year Reynolds died tragically at the age of 13. Reynolds was a student at Beaufort Academy during his short, but full-of-adventure life.

This scholarship is awarded by his family in celebration and remembrance of Reynolds. Recipients must possess many of the qualities that people loved about Reynolds, such as strong leadership and athletic ability and the respect and friendship of classmates, in addition to maintaining a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 during the seventh, eighth and ninth grades.

Awarded to a 10th grader, the scholarship offers $1,500 toward the student’s college education.

Church leaders to visit Holy Trinity students

Twelve senior leaders from the Anglican Leadership Institute will visit with students from Holy Trinity on Saturday, Sept. 17, to learn more about the classical Christian education provided to students at the school. The leaders, primarily Anglican, hail from three countries in Africa, as well as North and South America, China and the Middle East.

The program at the Parish Church of St. Helena will include presentations by Holy Trinity students on what a classical Christian education means to them, a recitation from one of the great books, a musical performance, a parent testimony and a keynote address by the Rev. Chad E. Lawrence, the school headmaster.

School district sets Jan. 4 as make-up day

The Beaufort County School District has set Wednesday, Jan. 4, 2017, as the make-up day for classes missed when the district closed schools during Tropical Storm Hermine.

Classes were originally scheduled to reopen after winter break on Thursday, Jan. 5.  Schools will now reopen on Jan. 4.

USCB team develops website for Penn Center

A year of planning, development and plain old hard work by a team of students at the University of South Carolina Beaufort culminated in a fresh, new website for the Penn Center in July. Now the team is already planning to develop a new website for a second client, the Heritage Library Foundation on Hilton Head Island.

Working closely with Victoria Smalls, director of Development and Marketing, and Mariah Robinson, a former intern at Penn Center, Dr. Brian Canada began researching the 100 most-effective nonprofit websites to find appropriate examples to emulate.

Visit www.penncenter.com to see the updated website.

Holy Trinity students study Latin to learn English grammar

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holy-trinity

Why should anyone learn Latin? It’s a dead language, right?

Quite the contrary, actually. There are many reasons to learn Latin. It’s the language of law, government, logic and theology. It’s also the most efficient way to learn English grammar. In fact, the study of Latin is a key building block in the learning process at Holy Trinity Classical Christian School in Beaufort.

“Children begin to learn Latin during the grammar phase as the language not only serves as the underpinning for much of the English language and vocabulary, but it also begins to train the mind to think precisely and logically.”

Elizabeth Booman teaches second grade at Holy Trinity. Her students begin their formal Latin instruction with “Prima Latina: Introduction to Christian Latin.” As a gentle introduction to the language, it prepares her 7-year-olds for the more advanced study of Latin yet to come.

Each weekly lesson consists of a grammar form, 10 vocabulary words and a Latin saying that teaches students about their Christian or classical heritage. Each lesson also includes simple English derivatives of Latin words to help build their English vocabulary.

“I love making up fun, fast-paced activities to do in Latin,” she said. “Games like ‘derivative bingo’ and ‘flashcard frenzy’ keep us smiling and on our toes. We also love our morning Latin recitation, where we chant or sing every Latin word we know. As our vocabulary list gets longer and longer, we get louder and prouder!”

Students in third grade use “Latina Christiana,” while older students rely on the “Memoria Press” series, which endeavors to teach the whole of the Latin grammar in four years through clear explanations, easy instructions and a step-by-step approach. Students in the grammar stage memorize Latin grammar by employing the time-tested method of oral recitation and form drills.

By the time Holy Trinity students reach the high school years, they will be prepared to engage Ovid, Virgil and Caesar in their original works.

Founded in 2012, Holy Trinity Classical Christian School provides 275 students with a distinctly Christian and classical education. Holy Trinity is the result of a long-standing commitment to education by the Parish Church of St. Helena, beginning in 1748 with the founding of the first free school in Beaufort and later in 1801 by the donation of 20 acres of land for the establishment of Beaufort College, resulting in what is now the University of South Carolina Beaufort.  The current student body of Holy Trinity is comprised of families from over a dozen Christian churches of various denominations. For more information about the academic excellence offered at Holy Trinity, visit www.htccs.org.

Top photo: “I love teaching Latin because of the excitement coming from the students: they can’t wait to learn a new word or phrase, they can’t wait to discover a new and amazing connection between Latin and English, and they can’t wait to impress their family and friends with the challenging derivatives! …They are better ENGLISH learners because they are LATIN learners!” said Elizabeth Booman, second-grade teacher, HTCCS.

School briefs for September 8th-14th

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Coosa Elementary receives grant

Coosa Elementary School recently received a $2,500 youth literacy grant from the Dollar General Literacy Foundation.

This grant is part of $4.5 million in youth literacy grants awarded to approximately 1,000 organizations across the 43 states that Dollar General serves.

Given at the beginning of the academic school year, these grants are aimed at supporting teachers, schools and organizations with resources to strengthen and enhance literacy instruction.

“By awarding these grants, the Dollar General Literacy Foundation is committed to making a meaningful impact in our local communities,” said Todd Vasos, Dollar General’s chief executive officer. “These grants provide funds to support youth literacy initiatives and educational programs throughout the communities we serve to ensure a successful academic year
for students.”

Committed to helping increase the literacy skills of individuals of all ages, the Dollar General Literacy Foundation has awarded more than $127 million in grants to nonprofit organizations, helping nearly 7.9 million individuals take their first steps toward literacy or continued education since its inception in 1993.

Bingham named to President’s List

John Bingham, of Beaufort, was among 53 other cadets at The Citadel that were named to the President’s List for the spring 2016 semester.

The President’s List is one of the most distinguished cadet awards presented by The Citadel. It indicates excellence in academics and military duties.

The list is a combination of the Dean’s List and the Commandant’s Distinguished List and is composed of cadets who contribute the most to their companies while maintaining excellent military and academic records.

Local students outperform state averages

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Beaufort County School District seniors – members of the district’s first graduating class where 100 percent of its students took the ACT college entrance exam – scored above South Carolina averages in 2016.

The composite 2016 ACT average for all Beaufort County School District seniors was 18.7, compared to the state public and private school combined average of 18.5.

Scores range from a low of 1 to a high of 36.

District averages were also higher for combined public and private school averages in all four ACT exams used to determine composite scores.

Among individual district high schools, Battery Creek High 11th-graders’ 2016 composite average score was 16.4, Beaufort High’s was 19, Bluffton High’s was 19.3, Hilton Head Island High’s was 19.5 and Whale Branch Early College High’s was 16.5

The ACT is a group of curriculum-based achievement exams designed to measure the academic skills taught in schools and deemed important for success in first-year college courses.

The General Assembly approved mandatory ACT testing for all 11th-graders in 2014.

Like the six other states that instated similar requirements, South Carolina saw declines in average 2016 ACT scores reported for seniors because all of them had taken the ACT as juniors in 2015.

In the Beaufort County School District, scores were reported for 1,259 seniors in 2016 compared to 591 the previous year.

Previously, the decision to take the ACT was optional for South Carolina high school students. Students will take the test whether or not they plan to attend college.

Students do not have to pass the ACT test to receive a high school diploma.

“These 2016 scores amount to a baseline year for Beaufort County because it’s our first senior class where everyone took the ACT,” said Superintendent Jeff Moss. “While our seniors scored above the state average, our goal is to exceed the national average and ultimately be among the nation’s leaders.”

State and national testing experts attributed the drop in seniors’ scores from 2015 to 2016 to the state’s newly instituted 100 percent-tested requirement.

Moss stressed the importance of high school students taking courses recommended by both the ACT and SAT.  Those courses include four years of English; three or more years of mathematics, including algebra I and II and geometry; three or more years of social studies, including American history and government and world history; and three or more years of natural sciences, such as general, physical and earth science, biology, chemistry and physics.

School briefs for September 1st-7th

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Ribbon-cutting held at May River High

School district and Bluffton town leaders cut a ceremonial royal blue and silver ribbon and then followed student guides on a tour of May River High, the district’s newest high school since Whale Branch Early College High opened in 2010.

Nearly 1,000 students attend college-prep and advanced technical classes at May River High. Its Advanced Technical Center offers four areas of study – automotive, engineering, health sciences, mechatronics and welding – that have attracted students from other attendance zones who applied for admission through the district’s expanded school choice program. The building has the capacity to house as many as 1,400 students and offers room for additional expansion.

“It’s the most economical high school we’ve built from a cost standpoint, and we’re very proud of it,” said Superintendent Jeff Moss.  “We’re also proud of the staff and students who work here each day. The school pride within this building is amazing, and it’s contagious.”

Holy Trinity nourishes body, mind and soul 

Plato, a pivotal figure in the development of Western philosophy, religion and education, once observed, “Gymnastic as well as music should begin in early years; the training in it should be careful and should continue through life.”

No one takes his observation more to heart than Amy Patrick, athletic director of the Holy Trinity Classical Christian School in Beaufort. Administrators, faculty and students at Holy Trinity believe that nourishing the body works in tandem with developing the mind and cultivating the soul of each of the school’s 275 students.

Responsibility for engaging all Holy Trinity students — from the age of 2 through high school — rests with a former double collegiate athlete. Patrick earned a Bachelor’s in Spanish with a minor in biology at Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pa., where she competed in cross country and lacrosse. Now a registered nurse, her academic interests involve physiology, anatomy and cultural awareness.

“As most things require teamwork,” she says, “the sooner young people can learn to work with others on and off the playing field, the better prepared they will be for difficult tasks and challenges later in life.”

“The students at Holy Trinity love the school, the teachers and their friends. The teachers love the school and they want their students to succeed," said Amy Patrick, above.
“The students at Holy Trinity love the school, the teachers and their friends. The teachers love the school and they want their students to succeed,” said Amy Patrick, above.
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