Bringing Our Community Together

Category archive

School News - page 2

Holy Trinity celebrates academic achievements

in School News/Schools by
holytrinity

It’s taken just eight years for the Holy Trinity Classical Christian School in Beaufort to grow from the seed of an idea planted over lunch into a viable educational institution.

On Aug. 17, some 275 students headed back to Holy Trinity for their first day of the new school year.

The school provides a classical Christian education in the same vein as that afforded the great thinkers and scientists in western civilization.

Today, students in grades preschool through nine at Holy Trinity are taking many of the same courses: Latin, the great works of poetry, literature, art, music and history. They are learning to master phonics and mathematics, and all within the framework of a Christ-centered learning environment.

“This is an education that not only provides a person with a rich understanding of the world,” said the Rev. Chad E. Lawrence, the school headmaster, “it also teaches students how to think and how to engage in the great questions and challenges of the day with the wisdom of the ages.”

Holy Trinity has won accolades for its level of excellence in education. Its students consistently rank in the top 10 percent in national test scores. With an exceptional retention rate, school enrollment increases every year as a new grade is added. With an average class size of 14 students, individual attention is assured.

And it all began with the germ of an idea. One day in 2007, the Rev. Jeff Miller, then rector of the Parish Church of St. Helena, met with a small group of friends over lunch and posed the idea of starting a classical Christian school in Beaufort. The group embraced the concept and the seed was planted.

Things moved quickly after that. Within two years, an ad hoc committee was formed to research classical Christian education and the feasibility of founding such a school in Beaufort.

In June of 2011, the 40-member Board of Governors met for the first time. The board adopted bylaws and elected a Board of Trustees. It affirmed the school’s mission and statement of faith. And it began the process of applying for 501(c)3 tax-exempt status.

At its first meeting, the board offered the position of founding headmaster to the Rev. Chad Lawrence, a curate at the Parish Church of St. Helena. In September of 2011, Lawrence formally assumed the role of founding headmaster with a goal of opening the school in August 2012.

Over the course of the next year, Lawrence and the Board of Trustees searched for a suitable building, hired teachers, selected the curricula and recruited students. Today’s Holy Trinity students hail from at least a dozen Christian churches in the Lowcountry.

In August 2012, right on schedule, Holy Trinity opened its doors to 100 students in preschool through fifth grade in a building leased from the Beaufort County School District. Holy Trinity administrators plan to add a grade a year until they can provide a classical Christian education to students in preschool through 12th grade.

Seventy-five percent of the Board of Governors do not have a child or grandchild at Holy Trinity.

“We are so grateful for those who are willing to look beyond themselves and support a venture that has borne so much fruit for children, our families and the community,” said Lawrence. “Not only is their work bearing fruit in Beaufort today, it will undoubtedly continue to do so for many years to come, both locally and abroad as our graduates venture out into the world.”

School enrollment has grown so rapidly that the preschool moved to a satellite campus at the Parish Church of St. Helena. The grammar and upper school remained at the original Burroughs Avenue location.

Suzanne Schwank, the recently elected chair of the 44-member Board of Governors, said, “Holy Trinity is a response to the accelerating descent of western civilization into a world view of secular humanism.

“Its founding vision was to raise up young men and women formed with a Christian world view who are so trained, educated and equipped that they can go into the world as Christ’s ambassadors, able to engage a fracturing civilization at all levels of academia and society.

“This called for a school both Christ-centered and academically rigorous. Many of us could visualize the young adults graduating from such a school, but few of us imagined the children and student body that would appear in the meantime, or their impact on the faith life of the entire family that parents are reporting.”

School briefs for August 18th-24th

in School News/Schools by
Corey Hollis, left, and Ty Page, 7, great each other for the first time during Port Royal Elementary School’s meet-and-greet Aug. 12. With Ty is his mother, Jessica Lawson. Aug. 15 marked the first day of public school throughout Beaufort County. Photo by Bob Sofaly.
Corey Hollis, left, and Ty Page, 7, great each other for the first time during Port Royal Elementary School’s meet-and-greet Aug. 12. With Ty is his mother, Jessica Lawson. Aug. 15 marked the first day of public school throughout Beaufort County. Photo by Bob Sofaly.
As one of it major programs, the Rotary Club of Beaufort supports exchange students attending Beaufort schools. The first of two exchange students for school year 2016-17 are Karolina Struharova, right, from the Czech Republic. Here, she exchanges the banner from her home Rotary, Klatovy, Czech Republic, with Rotary Club of Beaufort President Willie Mack Stansell. Struharova will be a junior at Beaufort Academy. Photo by Lisa Harrington.
As one of it major programs, the Rotary Club of Beaufort supports exchange students attending Beaufort schools. The first of two exchange students for school year 2016-17 are Karolina Struharova, right, from the Czech Republic. Here, she exchanges the banner from her home Rotary, Klatovy, Czech Republic, with Rotary Club of Beaufort President Willie Mack Stansell. Struharova will be a junior at Beaufort Academy. Photo by Lisa Harrington.
An early care and education student reads aloud to children at a local elementary school.
An early care and education student reads aloud to children at a local elementary school.

TCL is re-accredited by the NEAYC

The Technical College of the Lowcountry early care and education program recently received re-accreditation by the National Association for the Education of Young Children.

“NAEYC accreditation affirms that we are offering the highest level of educational experience for our students,” said Kelli Boniecki, early care and education program director.

NAEYC is the most respected national early childhood association and seeks to foster high-quality programs through its accreditation. This extensive process includes the submission of hundreds of pages of documents and a three-day examination of the instructors, courses and facilities by a committee selected by NAEYC.

“Employers recognize and value NAEYC accreditation. They know that when they hire our graduates, they are getting a highly-qualified early childhood professional,” Boniecki said.

TCL’s early care and education associate degree program can be completed in six semesters. Coursework ranges from guidance and classroom management to science and math concepts.

Other courses offer hands-on laboratory field experiences providing students the opportunity to observe children in early childhood settings. General education courses such as English, algebra and public speaking round out the curriculum.

The program culminates with a semester-long supervised field experience course that provides students with real-world, hands-on experience in child care settings across the Lowcountry. Four specialty certificate and diploma programs are also offered.

For more information, visit www.tcl.edu/earlycare.

Bluffton students graduate from CCU

Coastal Carolina University held commencement ceremonies for an estimated 360 candidates on Aug. 5 at the HTC Student Recreation and Convocation Center on campus.

Speaker Robert Young congratulated the class for being the “first CCU students ever to graduate from the No.1 university in the nation,” referencing the national College World Series baseball title CCU won on June 30. Young is professor of marine science and director of undergraduate research at CCU.

Graduation candidates are William Ball, Patrick Briody and Clark Sinclair, all of Bluffton.

River Ridge Academy holds service day

River Ridge Academy recently held a Community Service Day where about 75 teachers hit the Bluffton community with random acts of service and kindness at over 50 businesses.

They went to various businesses and other organizations and were tasked with completing a list of  “acts of service” that included things like picking up 20 pieces of trash, holding the door (with a smile) for 25 customers, helping to unload groceries and donating books to doctor’s offices.

“Our school prides itself on the character development of our students,” said Principal Gary McCulloch. “We afford our students many learning opportunities through huddle and morning meeting to identify character practices and practice them in our school. The soft skills developed will help our students become a productive and impactful citizen.

“We are giving back to our generous school community in ways of kindness that will let people know that we appreciate them.”

Behavior rules, other changes are coming for school bus riders

in School News/Schools by
buses

Screen Shot 2016-08-18 at 11.39.30 AM

By Aileen Goldstein

More than 12,000 Beaufort County students will be catching their buses – which travel over 11,000 miles every school day – on Monday morning as they head back to school.

This year, however, some things have changed in the district’s transportation plans.

First, students who misbehave on school buses will face stricter punishments.

New rules state that students who commit Level II violations such as fighting or using profanity, will be kicked off the bus for the remainder of the school year.

Another change is the move away from a private company providing transportation in the district.

In April, the Beaufort County Board of Education voted to end the relationship with Durham School Services, a private sector transportation provider that served the county for the last six years.

According to Kerry Mayo, director of transportation, the decision for the district to take over control of transportation will save money.

The state allocates buses to school districts according to attendance numbers.   Beaufort County uses 155 state buses. The previous transportation provider used 40 of its own buses in addition to the state buses.

The Beaufort County School District ordered 40 buses to replace those buses.  The new buses have arrived and are currently being outfitted with radios and cameras and will be ready on the first day of school.

In addition, Mayo said many of Durham’s drivers were hired by the district to continue driving buses for the county.

Along with a new school opening this year, May River High in Bluffton, there are also new bell schedules for elementary students.

Elementary schools will be the first wave of the school day and will be beginning their day earlier than last year.

Mayo warns parents this will present different issues to be aware of as school starts and when the time changes in the fall.

“Elementary school children may be in the dark at bus stops,” Mayo said, “and parents should be aware of this as the time changes.”

The bell schedule changes may also affect after-school care for elementary students.

“Sometimes parents would have their middle school or high school student wait on the elementary student, and that is not going to happen now because the older students will still be in school while the elementary students are getting off the bus,” warns Mayo.

Mayo also stressed the importance of drivers being more aware as school buses are back on the roads transporting children to and from school.

“Buses are the safest mode of travel there is, but the loading and unloading is the most dangerous time for our students,” she said. “Make sure to stop well in advance when you see a bus about to stop with the flashing lights and stop signs out.”

Screen Shot 2016-08-18 at 11.40.03 AM

School briefs for August 11th-17th

in School News/Schools by

USCB, TCL named to list of top military-friendly schools

The University of South Carolina Beaufort and Technical College of the Lowcountry have earned spots on BestColleges.com’s recently-released list of “America’s Top Military-Friendly Colleges,” specifically the sub-list “Best Colleges for Veterans.”

The site says the featured schools “go above and beyond in their approach to veterans and military families by offering additional services which include financial-aid opportunities beyond the norm, special counseling services, veteran-oriented career consulting and much more.”

2016 Summer Institute welcomes 1,000-plus educators for workshops

More than 1,000 Beaufort County School District teachers and staff attended three days of intensive professional development training as they prepared for the first day of classes on Monday, Aug. 15.

The district’s ninth annual Summer Institute, which was held at Bluffton High School and H.E. McCracken Middle School, featured more than 250 sessions.

Workshops covered a broad range of topics, including using technology to engage more students in reading; improving classroom management; employing Twitter as an instructional and a communications tool; using physical objects to teach abstract mathematical concepts; creating effective classroom tests; employing Rosetta Stone to learn foreign languages online; and training coaches in CPR and basic first aid.

“Student achievement in Beaufort County has improved dramatically in recent years, and a critical component in maintaining that improvement will be effective professional development for teachers and staff,” said Superintendent Jeff Moss.

N’Kia Campbell, who coordinates professional development for the district, said that the Summer Institute’s goal is to take research-based instructional concepts and make them work in school classrooms.

“It’s about exploring ideas and strategies that can be a bit abstract, then translating those ideas and strategies into real-world practices that connect with students and help them learn,” Campbell said.

Solicitor helps students prepare for law school

Charlotte Loper hasn’t even started law school, but she already has courtroom experience.

Loper, who graduated from Bluffton High in 2012, and attended the University of South Carolina where she earned undergraduate degrees in political science and criminal justice, was one of four students to complete this summer’s Externship and Career Prosecutor Program through the Fourteenth Circuit Solicitor’s Office.

After eight weeks of working in a busy prosecutor’s office. Loper will now head to North Carolina, where she begins her first year at Wake Forest University School of Law.

“This experience just solidified the career path that I wanted to follow,” Loper said. “We were able to trial board the cases and it was a real team effort.”

This marks the fourth year the Fourteenth Circuit Solicitor’s Office has opened its doors to undergraduate students and law students for a hands-on experience. Selected students work cases from arrest to disposition.

Phillips plans to graduate this winter and take the state’s bar exam in February 2017.

To learn more about the Fourteenth Circuit Solicitor’s Office Externship and Career Prosecutor Program, visit www.scsolicitor14.org.

From left, Shane S. Scibelli and Kevin M. Phillips, both of the Charleston School of Law; Charlotte Loper of Wake Forest University School of Law; and Patrick Sancomb of the Savannah Law School recently completed an intensive eight-week externship with the Fourteenth Circuit Solicitor’s Office.
From left, Shane S. Scibelli and Kevin M. Phillips, both of the Charleston School of Law; Charlotte Loper of Wake Forest University School of Law; and Patrick Sancomb of the Savannah Law School recently completed an intensive eight-week externship with the Fourteenth Circuit Solicitor’s Office.

TCL honors 47 health sciences graduates

in School News/Schools by

The Technical College of the Lowcountry honored 47 health sciences graduates at its Aug. 4 pinning ceremonies.

“We are so proud of these graduates for their perseverance and commitment to excellence,” Health Sciences Dean Dr. Glenn Levicki said. “TCL’s health sciences programs are rigorous but produce extremely qualified and successful graduates, giving them the confidence they need to walk proudly into the field.”

Students experience on-campus learning using high-tech simulation equipment and receive intense additional hands-on practice at clinical sites located throughout Beaufort, Jasper, Hampton and Colleton counties. Many students go right to work in the Lowcountry. Visit www.tcl.edu/health for more information.

The TCL Associate Degree Nursing graduates are Tracy E. Biel, Scott J. Brassard, Hunter Clark, Jillian Delucia, Charlene Dziamniski and Christol L. Gillespie, all of Beaufort; Haley Kanehl, of Effingham, Ga.; Christopher A. Lee, of Beaufort; LaDawn Mack, of Jasper; Christina M. O'Quinn, of Colleton; Katherine E. Pfeifer and Connie V. Pratt, both of Beaufort; Michelle A. Reiser, of Effingham; Jessica Tysinger, of Jasper; and Samara L. Ugalde-Ramirez and Carly C. Ware, both of Beaufort. The Practical Nursing graduates are Halle Boni, of Jasper; Stephanie Nease, of Chatham, Ga.; and Tuesday Stein and Gail Totherow, both of Beaufort.
The TCL Associate Degree Nursing graduates are Tracy E. Biel, Scott J. Brassard, Hunter Clark, Jillian Delucia, Charlene Dziamniski and Christol L. Gillespie, all of Beaufort; Haley Kanehl, of Effingham, Ga.; Christopher A. Lee, of Beaufort; LaDawn Mack, of Jasper; Christina M. O’Quinn, of Colleton; Katherine E. Pfeifer and Connie V. Pratt, both of Beaufort; Michelle A. Reiser, of Effingham; Jessica Tysinger, of Jasper; and Samara L. Ugalde-Ramirez and Carly C. Ware, both of Beaufort. The Practical Nursing graduates are Halle Boni, of Jasper; Stephanie Nease, of Chatham, Ga.; and Tuesday Stein and Gail Totherow, both of Beaufort.
The TCL Massage Therapy graduates are Virginia Campbell, Caroline F. Coleman and Ashley N. Frasier, all of Beaufort; Joshua Gardner, of Hampton; Ashana Jones-Bell, of Charleston; and Jacob Morris and Brian J. Welty, both of Beaufort.
The TCL Massage Therapy graduates are Virginia Campbell, Caroline F. Coleman and Ashley N. Frasier, all of Beaufort; Joshua Gardner, of Hampton; Ashana Jones-Bell, of Charleston; and Jacob Morris and Brian J. Welty, both of Beaufort.
The TCL Radiologic Technology graduates are Kelsey Adams and Anne Bower, both of Beaufort; Hannah Braxton, of Hampton; Megan Burns, Christopher Bullister, Kelly Davis, Staci DeBoer and Eduardo Diaz, all of Beaufort; Kelley Ferguson, of Charleston; Meagan Reynolds, of Colleton; and Iuliia Shvahcko, Emily Smith and Ashley Zimmerman, all of Beaufort.
The TCL Radiologic Technology graduates are Kelsey Adams and Anne Bower, both of Beaufort; Hannah Braxton, of Hampton; Megan Burns, Christopher Bullister, Kelly Davis, Staci DeBoer and Eduardo Diaz, all of Beaufort; Kelley Ferguson, of Charleston; Meagan Reynolds, of Colleton; and Iuliia Shvahcko, Emily Smith and Ashley Zimmerman, all of Beaufort.
The TCL Surgical Technology graduates are Shanquitta Addison, Nicole Beattie, Holly Beldock and Samantha Garcia, all of Beaufort; Paige Floyd, of Jasper; Jodi Harp and Amber Maddy, both of Beaufort; Kristina Pye, of Colleton; Tamika Roby and Jesamen Singleton, both of Beaufort; and Leonard Thomas, of Jasper.
The TCL Surgical Technology graduates are Shanquitta Addison, Nicole Beattie, Holly Beldock and Samantha Garcia, all of Beaufort; Paige Floyd, of Jasper; Jodi Harp and Amber Maddy, both of Beaufort; Kristina Pye, of Colleton; Tamika Roby and Jesamen Singleton, both of Beaufort; and Leonard Thomas, of Jasper.

Five educators are finalists for Teacher of the Year

in School News/Schools by
TOY FINALISTS 2016-17

Five classroom teachers have been named as finalists for Beaufort County’s 2016-17 District Teacher of the Year.

The finalists are Lawrence Anderson, a fourth-grade math teacher at Mossy Oaks Elementary; Bebe Cifaldi, a fourth-grade math and science teacher at Hilton Head Elementary School for the Creative Arts; Kelly Goudy, a second-grade teacher at Robert Smalls International Academy; Elizabeth MacMurray, a ninth-grade English language arts teacher at Hilton Head Island High; and Jennifer McKenzie, a media arts and social studies teacher at Beaufort Middle School.

Superintendent Jeff Moss announced the five selections before an audience of more than 1,000 educators at the opening session of Summer Institute 2016, the district’s annual summer professional development conference.

This year’s conference sessions are being held at Bluffton High School and H.E. McCracken Middle School.

“These are five outstanding classroom professionals, and any one of them would be an excellent representative for the Beaufort County School District’s teachers,” Moss said.

The District Teacher of the Year will be announced Sept. 16 at an awards breakfast.

Becoming District Teacher of the Year is a three-step process that began when school-level teachers of the year were selected in April. Those wishing to compete for District Teacher of the Year submitted detailed applications in June.

In the second step, a selection committee consisting of parents, former educators and community leaders from across Beaufort County reviewed the applications and rated them using a numerical scoring system. The five highest-scoring applicants were named as finalists.

In the next step, the five finalists will be interviewed by a separate review committee, again composed of judges from across the county. The judges will begin by reviewing a video of each teacher doing a classroom lesson. They will then score candidates based on how well they respond to questions about their teaching methods as shown in the video, as well as how they respond to questions about current education issues. After those interviews, the panel will select a District Teacher of the Year to represent Beaufort County’s classroom professionals.

The current Teacher of the Year is Beaufort Elementary School teacher Arecely Johnson.

Top photo from left: Jennifer McKenzie, Kelly Goudy, Lawrence Anderson, Elizabeth MacMurray and Bebe Cifaldi.

School briefs for August 4th-10th

in School News/Schools by
kinghorn

St. Helena Elementary has new principal

Tara Mack
Tara Mack

A veteran assistant principal has been named as principal at St. Helena Elementary School.

Superintendent Jeff Moss said that Tara Mack, an assistant principal at St. Helena Elementary from 2010-2013 and at Mossy Oaks Elementary from 2013-2016, will assume her new role immediately. She replaces Senfronia Smith, who was named earlier this month as principal of Cross High School in Berkeley County.

“Dr. Mack is a strong leader, and I’m confident that she will do a tremendous job at St. Helena Elementary,” Moss said.  “She already has work experience there, and she lives on St. Helena Island and knows the local community well.”

Mack has worked in the Beaufort County School District for the past 20 years. Prior to her six years as an assistant principal, she was a literacy coach at Broad River Elementary and also taught first grade at Broad River and St. Helena.

She was honored as Broad River Elementary’s 2009-2010 Teacher of the Year and also as a 2016 Emerging Leader by the South Carolina Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.  She is a National Board-certified teacher.

“I’m excited to be going to St. Helena Elementary for a lot of reasons,” Mack said.  “It’s where I started my teaching career right out of college, and because I live on the island, I know what a wonderful group of children and parents we serve there.  It’s also exciting because we already have a terrific team in place and ready to go.”

Mack has a bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education from The University of South Carolina in Columbia, a master’s degree in Elementary Education from Cambridge College in Boston, a doctorate in Child and Youth Studies from Nova Southeastern University in Miami and an education specialist’s degree in Education Leadership from Liberty University.

Kinghorn Insurance Agency supports BA

Kinghorn Insurance Agency of Beaufort and The Selective Insurance Group Foundation joined forces to support the positive efforts of Beaufort Academy through a $500 grant.

The Selective Insurance Group Foundation is a philanthropic affiliate of Selective Insurance Group, Inc.

The grant represents a $500 donation from Kinghorn Insurance Agency of Beaufort, matched by a $500 grant from The Selective Insurance Group Foundation. The grant will help Beaufort Academy’s Annual Fund.

“At Selective, Response is everything®… and this includes responding to the communities where we live and work to give back and help those in need. Together with Kinghorn Insurance Agency of Beaufort, we are proud to support Beaufort Academy and its efforts to make a difference in the community,” said Chuck Musilli, senior vice president, Distribution Strategies, Selective.

Kinghorn Insurance of Beaufort has insured families and businesses in Beaufort and the surrounding area since 1898. As the oldest and one of the largest insurance agencies in the South Carolina Lowcountry, it takes great pride in its professionalism and personal service.

Selective Insurance Group, Inc. is a holding company for 10 property and casualty insurance companies rated “A” (Excellent) by A.M. Best. Through independent agents, the insurance companies offer standard and specialty insurance for commercial and personal risks, and flood insurance underwritten by the National Flood Insurance Program. Selective maintains a website at www.Selective.com.

Bluffton recruits nominees for youth service award

Mayor Lisa Sulka and the town of Bluffton are recruiting students to participate in the Mayor’s Youth Community Service Award Program for the coming school year.

Sulka created and implemented the town’s Youth Community Service Award Program last year as a way to encourage and acknowledge the contributions of Bluffton’s younger residents. This program is a venue for younger residents to invest their time and talent in community programs and to be acknowledged for their service at the end of the school year.

“Part of the Bluffton culture is to contribute to our neighbors in time, talent or treasures,” Sulka said. “This program is important because it gives high school students a venue to make a difference in other people’s lives. Our local nonprofits can also tap into the talents of these energetic students, while at the same time the students have an opportunity to enhance their college and employment applications while experiencing the rewards of volunteerism.”

This award program will provide high school sophomores and juniors recognition for their volunteerism in the greater Bluffton community.

Sulka will formally recognize the students who volunteer at least 50 hours during the school year.

At May’s Bluffton Town Council meeting, Sulka recognized three students who received the Mayor’s Exceptional Service Award for registering more than 100 hours of community service and an additional 11 students received the Gold Award for performing more than 50 community service hours.

For program requirements and more information, visit www.townofbluffton.sc.gov/mayor.

Back-to-School Expo to be held in Bluffton

The second Back-to-School Expo will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 6, at Bluffton High School.

The school district teams up with government agencies and private-sector business partners for the expo events, which are designed to give students and their families a day of fun and useful information about the upcoming 2016-17 school year.

An expo was recently held at Whale Branch Early College High School.

Participating business partners include Hargray, Walgreen’s, Walmart and Sodexo. The Bluffton High expo will feature:

  • Booths operated by district schools that can supply information about school activities.
  • Free school supplies for students, courtesy of Walmart, Walgreen’s and the district’s “Pack the Bus” campaign.
  • Free dental and health screenings for adults and children, including free HIV testing, by Beaufort-Jasper-Hampton Comprehensive Health Services and Beaufort Memorial Hospital.
  • Help with school registration and school lunch applications.

Top photo: Jay Taylor, a Beaufort Academy alumni and parent representing Kinghorn Insurance, is shown here with and the headmaster of Beaufort Academy, Stephen Schools.

School briefs for July 28th-August 3rd

in School News/Schools by

TCL will host Aviation Showcase July 28

The Technical College of the Lowcountry is hosting an Aviation Showcase at 5 p.m. Thursday, July 28, at the TCL Beaufort Campus.

Visitors will get up-close access to TCL’s aviation lab and equipment, including a Cessna 150. In addition, current students will invite visitors to participate in hands-on demonstrations of VHF radio communications, a turbine engine borescope, aluminum rivet station and more.

Refreshments will be provided.

“This is a great opportunity for people of all ages to see what a career in aviation might look like,” said Sean Henrickson, TCL’s director for Military Education. “Plus, it will also allow students in the Airframes and Powerplants program to showcase the variety of skills they’ve learned and mastered.”

TCL’s current Aviation Professional Programs include aviation maintenance and a commercial radio licensing prep course. Future offerings will include structures and composite courses.

For more information, call 843-525-9369.

Back-to-School Expo to be held in Bluffton

The second Back-to-School Expo will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 6, at Bluffton High School.

The school district teams up with government agencies and private-sector business partners for the expo events, which are designed to give students and their families a day of fun and useful information about the upcoming 2016-17 school year.

An expo was recently held at Whale Branch Early College High School.

Participating business partners include Hargray, Walgreen’s, Walmart and Sodexo. The Bluffton High expo will feature:

  • Booths operated by district schools that can supply information about school activities.
  • Free school supplies for students, courtesy of Walmart, Walgreen’s and the district’s “Pack the Bus” campaign.
  • Free dental and health screenings for adults and children, including free HIV testing, by Beaufort-Jasper-Hampton Comprehensive Health Services and Beaufort Memorial Hospital.
  • Help with school registration and school lunch applications.

Local students named to Dean’s List

The following students were recently named to the University of South Carolina Upstate Dean’s List: Aqeela Aiken, Jaquille Mosley and Terryann Tracey, all of Bluffton; and Janell Berks, Monique Bing, Jordan Fields, Kyrrah Singleton, Sarah Wilson and Chelsea Witter, all of Beaufort.

To be eligible for the Dean’s List, freshmen students must earn a 3.25 or higher and be enrolled in at least 12 course hours and upperclassmen must earn a 3.5 or higher and be enrolled in at least 12 course hours.

tcl massage

TCL re-accredited for massage program

The Commission on Massage Therapy Accreditation (COMTA) recently renewed its accreditation of the Technical College of the Lowcountry Massage Therapy certificate program through the year 2023. TCL has the only COMTA-accredited Massage Therapy program in the state of South Carolina and was awarded the maximum seven years renewal.

In addition, Program Director Denise Van Nostran has been appointed to a four-year term as COMTA commissioner, a member of the panel responsible for evaluating accreditation applications from massage therapy programs across the nation.

“Because of COMTA accreditation and the success rates of our graduates, students have relocated to our area to participate in the TCL Massage Therapy program,” Van Nostran said.

Over the past 10 years, the TCL Massage Therapy program has graduated 90 students. In the last five years, 100 percent of the program graduates have passed the Massage and Bodywork Licensing Exam and obtained licensure.

The three-semester certificate program includes 31 credits (750 hours) of in-class instruction and hands-on clinical practice in TCL’s lab and in partner sites across the Lowcountry.

For more information, visit www.tcl.edu/massage.

Jack Kiessling graduates from RIT

Rochester Institute of Technology celebrated its 131st Academic Convocation in May. Diplomas were distributed to graduates following the event at separate ceremonies held by each of RIT’s nine colleges and two academic centers.

Jack Kiessling of Beaufort received a bachelor’s degree in manufacturing engineering technology from RIT’s College of Applied Science and Technology.

County students can enroll online

The Beaufort County School District’s online student registration system for the 2016-17 academic year is open for business.

“The thing we continue to hear from parents is that they appreciate being able to register from home and not having to come to their children’s schools to fill out paper forms,” said Superintendent Jeff Moss. “Our schools like it because they reduce the paperwork associated with back-to-school registration.”

Using PowerSchool Registration (previously known as InfoSnap), parents can access customized online forms for each student to update student information, provide emergency contact and vital medical information, read and agree to important notifications and sign up for special school services.

As an added bonus, parents with more than one child in district schools can copy many basic registration materials rather than filling out separate forms for each child.

Parents receive a unique “Snapcode” for each child enrolled in a district school. Snapcodes are being sent by e-mail to the families of nearly 17,500 students with registered e-mail accounts.

Parents log into the PowerSchool Registration site using the link provided in the e-mail or letter and create an account similar to what they currently do in the district’s “Parent Portal” system.  Parents must complete all of the information required before submitting the form, but uncompleted work can be saved and accessed later by logging back into their account. Once the form is submitted, parents will be asked if there is another student to register. Information that is applicable can be copied from the first child’s form to the second child’s.

Parents who don’t have e-mail accounts, who face language barriers or need assistance can register at their children’s current or future schools.  District schools have multiple computers dedicated to PowerSchool Registration, and parents can sit down with school personnel to complete their children’s registrations.

Parents will still be required to provide proof of residence, either in person at their children’s schools or by submitting the necessary forms by mail.  There’s also a third option for parents because proof of residency forms may now be uploaded using PowerSchool Registration.

If a student is new to the school district, the parents will also need to visit the school first to obtain their “Snapcode.”

Parents are encouraged to complete registrations before the beginning of the school year.

School briefs for July 21st-27th

in School News/Schools by

Raise the Dough helps local school

On the first Tuesday of every month through August, Papa John’s will donate 20 percent of its online orders to John Paul II Catholic School in Okatie.

To participate, go to papajohns.com and place an online order at participating stores. Enter promo code JP2CSRTD, then click apply. (Don’t forget to do this part because this is how the order will be tracked.)

Participating stores are on Hilton Head at 24 Palmetto Bay Road; in Bluffton at 80 Baylor Drive; and in Beaufort at 330 Robert Smalls Parkway.

TCL will host Aviation Showcase on July 28

The Technical College of the Lowcountry is hosting an Aviation Showcase at 5 p.m. Thursday, July 28, at the TCL Beaufort Campus.

Visitors will get up-close access to TCL’s aviation lab and equipment, including a Cessna 150. In addition, current students will invite visitors to participate in hands-on demonstrations of VHF radio communications, a turbine engine borescope, aluminum rivet station and more.

Refreshments will be provided.

“This is a great opportunity for people of all ages to see what a career in aviation might look like,” said Sean Henrickson, TCL’s director for Military Education. “Plus, it will also allow students in the Airframes and Powerplants program to showcase the variety of skills they’ve learned and mastered.”

TCL’s current Aviation Professional Programs include aviation maintenance and a commercial radio licensing prep course. Future offerings will include structures and composite courses.

For more information, call 843-525-9369.

Eight schools to offer free breakfast, lunch

Eight district schools are offering free breakfasts and lunches to all of their students.

The Community Eligibility Provision, a federally funded initiative, serves schools with high percentages of students from low-income families.

The eight participating schools in Beaufort County this year are Beaufort Elementary, Lady’s Island Elementary, Robert Smalls International Academy, Joseph S. Shanklin Elementary, St. Helena Elementary, Whale Branch Elementary, Whale Branch Middle and Whale Branch Early College High.

Other schools will continue to offer free and reduced-price lunches to students whose families apply and demonstrate financial need under the National School Lunch Program, through which the district serves free meals to more than 10,000 students and reduced-price lunches to about 1,300 more.

CEP, established in 2010, is funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.  Schools are eligible to participate if more than 40 percent of their students are determined to be low income.

In the eight participating Beaufort County schools, the average poverty rate is 84 percent.

Parents or guardians who do not want their children to participate in CEP can call Daniel Kolat at 843-322-0800.

USC Upstate recognizes recent graduates

The University of South Carolina Upstate recognized May graduates, including Kyrrah Singleton and Steven McKinnon Davis, both of Beaufort, during commencement exercises held May 3.

USC Upstate offers more than 40 bachelor’s degree programs in the liberal arts and sciences, business administration, nursing, and teacher education, and master’s degrees in education, informatics and nursing.

TCL to hold one-stop enrollment event

The Technical College of the Lowcountry will hold an apply-and-enrollment event from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday, July 28.

Participants can choose a program of study, apply for admission, complete placement testing, get financial aid information, register for classes and tour campuses.

The events will be held at the TCL campuses at Building 12, 921 Ribaut Road, Beaufort; the New River campus lobby, 100 Community College Drive, Bluffton; and the Hampton lobby, H. Mungin Center, 54 Tech Circle, Varnville.

Call 843-525-8207 or email admissions@tcl.edu for more information.

Two students win Pinckney scholarships

Two Beaufort County students, Christian Carter and Henry Jones, are in the first class of Reverend Pinckney Scholars.

The Reverend Pinckney Scholars Program was established by a group of anonymous donors in memory of the tragic June 17, 2015, shooting at Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston.

Named for the church’s late pastor, the scholarship program is dedicated to promoting access to higher education for African-American students. The scholarship is run by Coastal Community Foundation and provides up to $10,000 per year and other supportive resources over each scholar’s four years of college.

United Way collecting school supplies 

Women United of the United Way of the Lowcountry is coordinating Operation Backpack again this year to help more than 435 students at six elementary schools in Beaufort and Jasper counties prepare for the school year.

This program will provide students with a new backpack filled with school supplies and uniforms.

Operation Backpack aims to fill the gap and help students who are not served by other agencies by working with local guidance counselors and social workers to identify children needing school supplies at Hardeeville Elementary, Red Cedar Elementary, Ridgeland Elementary, Shanklin Elementary, St. Helena Elementary and Whale Branch Elementary.

The United Way of the Lowcountry is collecting school supplies for Operation Backpack through Friday, July 29.

The supplies include:

• Pocket folders (two pockets)

• Crayola washable markers

• #2 pencils (box of 12 count)

• Pencil bag (with three holes to fit into binder)

• Pencil sharpener

• Ruler (12 inch, clear if possible)

• Scissors (5 inch)

• Ear buds

• Glue sticks

• Composition notebook (marble)

• Index cards

• Three-ring binder (1 inch or 1 1/2 inch)

• Highlighter (yellow)

• Dividers for binders

• Hand sanitizer

• Box of facial tissue

• Backpack (standard size, no wheels)

• Gift cards (Old Navy and Walmart to purchase uniform shirts)

Donation boxes have been placed at numerous locations throughout the Lowcountry including:

• Beaufort Fire Station, 135 Ribaut Road, Beaufort

• Beaufort Jasper Water & Sewer Authority, 6 Snake Road, Okatie

• Lowcountry Insurance, 80 Lady’s Island Drive, Lady’s Island

• United Way of the Lowcountry offices at 2266 Boundary St. in Beaufort; 10 Buckingham Plantation Drive, Suite D, in Bluffton; and 1509 Grays Highway in Ridgeland

• Walmart (Beaufort Store), 350 Robert Smalls Parkway

Gift cards and checks should be mailed to United Way of the Lowcountry, P.O. Box 202, Beaufort, SC  29901.

(Note:  Checks need to be made out to United Way of the Lowcountry with “Operation Backpack” in the memo)

For more information, visit www.uwlowcountry.org; or contact Jaime Dailey-Vergara at jdaileyvergara@uwlowcountry.org or call 843-982-3040.

School briefs for July 7th-13th

in School News/Schools by
From left, Beaufort County students Halli Noid, Savannah Thomas and Jay McBrayer were among 47 rising high school juniors and seniors from across South Carolina who recently participated in the South Carolina Farm Bureau Federation’s 2016 Youth Leadership Conference in Newberry. The conference, held on the Campus of Newberry College, allowed students to gain valuable leadership skills, a better understanding of SC agriculture and of the South Carolina legislative process.
From left, Beaufort County students Halli Noid, Savannah Thomas and Jay McBrayer were among 47 rising high school juniors and seniors from across South Carolina who recently participated in the South Carolina Farm Bureau Federation’s 2016 Youth Leadership Conference in Newberry. The conference, held on the Campus of Newberry College, allowed students to gain valuable leadership skills, a better understanding of SC agriculture and of the South Carolina legislative process.

Jimenez named to Coker College Dean’s List

Omar Govea Jimenez, of Bluffton, has been named to the spring 2016 Dean’s List at Coker College for earning a 3.75 or higher grade point average (on a 4.0 scale).

Coosa Elementary earns international recognition

Coosa Elementary School has earned international recognition for the quality of its student leadership program based on the best-selling book “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.”

The prestigious recognition comes from the Franklin Covey Co., the worldwide consulting and training group that works with businesses and other institutions to improve performance.

Covey wrote “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People,” and the book’s leadership principles have been adapted for young children and used to guide schools in developing Leader in Me educational programs in more than 150 countries.

Of 2,524 Leader in Me schools worldwide, only 206 have achieved Lighthouse status after being evaluated and approved by a review team from Franklin Covey Co.

Whale Branch seniors earn associate degrees

A record 15 Whale Branch Early College High School seniors received two-year college associate’s degrees two weeks before they received their South Carolina high school diplomas.

The students took advantage of a partnership with the Technical College of the Lowcountry that allows Whale Branch students to take college courses – and earn two-year associate’s degrees – while still in high school, and at no cost to themselves or their parents.

Beaufort County schools win arts grants

Five Beaufort County schools have won more than $52,000 in grants to enhance arts education in their classrooms, the South Carolina Arts Commission has announced.

Only one South Carolina school district – Richland District 1 in Columbia – had more 2016 grant winners than Beaufort County.

The five schools were Beaufort Middle School ($9,437, eighth grant); Mossy Oaks Elementary ($12,883, first grant); Lady’s Island Elementary ($11,509, sixth grant); Lady’s Island Middle ($8,327, third grant); and Hilton Head Island School for the Creative Arts ($10,799, fourteenth grant).

Beaufort High ROTC brings home award 

Beaufort High School’s U.S. Air Force JROTC unit won the district’s 2016 Superintendent’s Cup. The 2016 Cup was awarded after cadets from all five district high schools competed in a drill team exhibition.

Judges scored the cadet teams based on their military appearance, precision, execution of movement, originality and time of routine.

The drill team competition was part of the 2016 JROTC Dining-In, a formal dinner for members of military organizations or units.

Go to Top