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School briefs for November 16th-22nd

in School News/Schools by

District receives $50,000 for screening programs

Hundreds of Beaufort County children are expected to receive developmental screenings and needed educational intervention to prepare them for kindergarten, thanks to $50,000 in additional funding from The Learning Center Fund of Coastal Community Foundation.

The screenings will be conducted by the Child Find Expansion Program, which offers comprehensive vision, hearing, speech and developmental screenings each month at Beaufort Elementary and Michael C. Riley Early Childhood Center for children ages 2½ to 6.

The Child Find team consists of a registered nurse, a speech therapist and early childhood professionals.  

Additional funding from The Learning Center Fund has allowed the program to hire an additional part-time early childhood professional to work directly with families in need of follow-up services and formal education for their children. 

Follow-up services include additional referrals, connections to community resources, home visits, parenting/child advocacy and proactive early interventions.

“Since 2013, we’ve been able to screen an additional 1,500 children and identified 329 children with suspected developmental delays,” said Ashley Hutchison, the district’s director of School Readiness. “The Learning Center’s support makes it possible to help prepare children for success in kindergarten and beyond.”

Learning Center board chairman Malcolm Goodridge and board member Charles Kresch were recognized for their organization’s latest donation at a recent Beaufort County Board of Education meeting.

During the past four years, the Child Find Expansion Program has received a total of $297,000 from the Learning Center Fund of Coastal Community Foundation.

A comprehensive media campaign has been successful in recruiting children from public, private and parochial schools, child care centers, family day care homes and Head Start. The Child Find Expansion Program also receives referrals from local pediatricians, the Medical University of South Carolina, Healthlink, the South Carolina Department of Social Services, Babynet, hospitals, Child Abuse Prevention Association, Citizens Opposed to Domestic Violence and Hope Haven.

 “Our goal as a community should be to keep our children energized about learning, through their school years and beyond,” said Learning Center board member Charles Kresch. “Through The Learning Center Fund, we aim for children to reach their highest potential.”

Child Find Expansion was designed to provide insight into the early intervention needs in Beaufort County. The Child Find data collection system developed by the district has the ability to track children throughout their educational careers and can be utilized in determining the percentage of children who are considered “ready to learn” upon entering the first grade.

“We know from research how much young learners can benefit from prekindergarten, and the first step for the school district is identifying these children’s specific needs,” Hutchison said.  “The support we’ve gotten from the Learning Center Fund has been extraordinary.”

For more information about the Child Find Expansion Program, contact Hutchison at 843-521-2399.

11th-graders outpace peers on ACT exams

District high school students outperformed their peers from across South Carolina on a key statewide exam during the 2016-17 school year, according to data released recently by the South Carolina Department of Education.

In the third year of South Carolina’s required statewide administration of ACT college entrance exams to all 11th-graders, Beaufort County students exceeded state averages in all five subject areas measured by the ACT.  Their average composite score was 18.4 on ACT’s 36-point scale compared to the state average of 17.7. 

Comparing scoring with previous years, district 11th-graders improved from 18.2 in 2015 to 18.3 in 2016 to 18.4 in 2017.

“Our 11th-graders have improved their ACT scores each year,” said Superintendent Jeff Moss. “We’re not where we want to be in terms of student achievement, but it’s encouraging that our high schools are making steady progress.”

In addition to state-required ACT testing in students’ junior year, individual students can choose to take the ACT additional times as seniors to increase their scores.   

School briefs for November 9th-16th

in School News/Schools by

SC college students given tourism awards

Pictured left to right are Angela Puleo, USCB; Alison Ann Lindsey, USC; Alison Phelps, Spartanburg Community College; Christopher King, Horry-Georgetown Tech; Duane Parrish, SCPRT director; Sonja Volk, Greenville Tech; Grayson Foster, Trident Tech; Hunter Gaffney, College of Charleston; Kari Mari Funk, Coastal Carolina; and Ollie Burns, Clemson.
Pictured left to right are Angela Puleo, USCB; Alison Ann Lindsey, USC; Alison Phelps, Spartanburg Community College; Christopher King, Horry-Georgetown Tech; Duane Parrish, SCPRT director; Sonja Volk, Greenville Tech; Grayson Foster, Trident Tech; Hunter Gaffney, College of Charleston; Kari Mari Funk, Coastal Carolina; and Ollie Burns, Clemson.

Nine South Carolina college students from hospitality-related programs were given Tourism Student Awards recently during a ceremony at the Lace House in Columbia. 

The students were recognized for outstanding academic achievement related to hospitality and tourism in South Carolina, including culinary studies.

One of those students was Angela Puleo, who is majoring in Hospitality Management at the University of South Carolina Beaufort. She received a plaque and a $1,500 scholarship.

Sponsored by the South Carolina Travel and Tourism Coalition, the Tourism Student Awards recognizes students who were recommended by faculty for exemplary work.  Scholarships are provided through the Fred Brinkman Memorial Fund, which is funded through a silent auction held annually at the Governor’s Conference on Tourism & Travel.

Colleges make sales pitches to more than 2,500 students

More than 70 colleges and universities made sales pitches to Beaufort County public and private high school juniors and seniors on Nov. 3 at a college fair that was expected to draw more than 2,500 students to the University of South Carolina Beaufort.

Schools advertising their programs to students ranged from small private colleges to large public universities.  

Local schools included the University of South Carolina Beaufort and the Technical College of the Lowcountry, while out-of-state schools included universities such as Florida State, Virginia Tech, Alabama, Kent State and Marshall.

Students visited booths staffed by college and university representatives who answered students’ questions about academic offerings, tuition costs and scholarship opportunities.

Beaufort County Schools Superintendent Jeff Moss said that the college fair’s goal is to focus students on preparing for new goals.

“Our school counselors emphasize to students that the best careers out there are going to require more education beyond high school,” Moss said. “The annual college fair is part of that emphasis. Our students get to sample more than 70 college and university programs in one place, and they also get a kick out of all of those schools competing for their attention.”

‘Our Schools’ TV show highlights finance, facilities

The Beaufort County School District’s Finance and Operations division and its facilities office are the focus of the latest “Our Schools” television program, which began airing on Nov. 3 on the County Channel.

Appearing with Superintendent Jeff Moss is Tonya Crosby, chief finance and operations officer; Larry Wilson, district manager for Sodexo, which provides food services at district schools; Mark Chauhan, Technology Services officer; Robert Oetting, Facilities, Planning and Construction officer; Carol Crutchfield, planning coordinator; and Mona Lise Dickson, principal of Whale Branch Early College High School.

“Our Schools” is a partnership between the school district and the County Channel.

“Our Schools” will air four times weekly: at 11:30 a.m. Mondays; 9 p.m. Tuesdays; 8:30 p.m. Thursdays; and 12:30 p.m. Saturdays.  

The broadcast airs on local cable networks: Comcast’s Channel 2, Hargray’s channels 9 and 113, and Spectrum Channel 63.  The show also will air at those times on the County Channel’s website www.bcgov.net/departments/community-services/county-channel/index.php

In addition, the show will be archived and can be watched any time at the same link.

State of the Schools highlights achievements, challenges

in School News/Schools by

More than 120 community members, business and government representatives, elected officials, board of education members, educators and students were briefed recently on the status of Beaufort County’s public schools at the district’s annual State of the Schools event.

The district also recognized outstanding individual contributions and achievements by students, educators and community volunteers.  

Special recognitions for 2017 were:

• World Impact Award: Art students and teachers from Bluffton, Hilton Head and May River high schools were honored for their work with the Memory Project. Using photos as guides, local students created portraits of children living in desperate circumstances in other countries, including children at refugee camps in war-torn Syria and Afghanistan. The Beaufort County students’ portraits were delivered to children overseas.

• Service to Community Award: Broad River Elementary teacher Angela Brown and her husband, Lt. Daniel Byrne, community support officer for the Burton Fire District, were honored for developing trauma kits that classroom teachers could use in emergency situations to keep severely injured students alive until emergency responders could take over. Teachers were trained on emergency procedures in August by Byrne and other Burton Fire District personnel.  Additional trauma kits are being sought for other district schools.

• Home-Grown Hero Award: St. Helena Elementary School prekindergarten teacher Merriam Browne was honored as an outstanding classroom professional who attended St. Helena Elementary as a student, went to college, became a teacher and then came back to her hometown roots to work.  Browne is the 2017-18 Teacher of the Year at St. Helena Elementary.

• Spirit of Success Award: Ivan Collier was honored as a student who had experienced hardships and setbacks as young adult, but turned his life around and got on track for a successful future. 

Collier, a 2017 graduate of Islands Academy, is currently working toward a college degree at the Technical College of the Lowcountry while also working as a manager at a local restaurant.

Superintendent Jeff Moss highlighted a number of 2017 achievements by the district, including:

• The seventh consecutive improvement in the district’s on-time high school graduation rate, which is at an all-time high.

• The fifth consecutive increase in college scholarship dollars, with 2017 district seniors earning more than $40 million, also an all-time high.

• For the first time ever, district high school students outperformed their peers across the state in all four end-of-course assessments (Algebra 1, Biology, English 1 and U.S. History and Constitution).

• District students in grades 3-8 outperformed their peers across the state in Mathematics (all six grades tested) and English Language Arts (three of six grades tested).

• A dramatic increase in the number of community volunteers in schools, from 1,300 three years ago to more than 7,200 today.

• An increase in the number of students taking advantage of the district’s school choice program, with more 3,500 students currently enrolled in schools outside their attendance zones.

• Nearly a quarter-million dollars raised for B3 scholarships that allow qualified Beaufort County students to attend the Technical College of the Lowcountry tuition-free.

Moss pointed out academic areas that remain as significant challenges, but he emphasized that district students and educators are making progress.

“Are we where we want to be? No,” Moss said.  “But are we doing well? Yes, I believe we are.”

Breakfast participants also heard performances by Beaufort High School’s Sea Island Sound Brass Quintet.

School briefs for October 26th-November 1st

in School News/Schools by

Retired businessman newest member of board

A retired businessman and school board veteran took his oath of office as the newest member of the Beaufort County Board of Education.

John Dowling was elected to fill the District 6 seat vacated by former board member Patricia Felton-Montgomery, representing portions of Okatie and Sun City Hilton Head. Felton-Montgomery resigned her seat earlier this year.

Before retiring and moving to Sun City, Dowling worked as a program manager at a computer company in Massachusetts.

He has also been a special education office manager in the Wachusett (Mass.) Regional School District and a staff member at the Massachusetts Association of School Committees (School Boards).  

He served three terms on the Narragansett Regional School Committee in Templeton, Mass.  

In addition, he served in the U.S. Army from 1966-1969.

“I’m thrilled with the opportunity that the voters have given me, and the trust that they’ve placed in me,” Dowling said. “I plan to hit the deck running and open a dialogue with my fellow board members to make a strong contribution to moving the school district forward.”

Polaris Tech seeks executive director

As architects and engineers finalize construction plans for the new Polaris Tech Charter School in Ridgeland, the steering committee is seeking an executive director to lead the school and prepare for the August 2018 opening.

“It’s an exciting step to have the executive director/head of school job being advertised at the same time our developer is working on final plans to get the school under construction,” said Sandra Chavez, chair of the Polaris Tech Steering Committee.

The executive director will be the only employee of the Polaris Tech board and will work closely with the board on matters such as hiring staff, finalizing curriculum, reviewing documents such as student and employee handbooks, and adding input to the school facility construction.

“This is our leadership position, and we are seeking a very special person to lead our very special school,” Chavez said. “Polaris Tech will be a different type of school for the Lowcountry and we are excited to show what we can do.”

The Polaris Tech academic emphasis will be on six career areas: aerospace, health science, information technology, logistics, advanced manufacturing and business management. It will serve up to 250 students in grades 6-10 when the school opens, and then will add one high school grade each year until it serves the span of middle and high school and offers diplomas.

The full job description is available at the Polaris Tech website, www.polaristech.org .

The new state charter school will be built in Ridgeland on the site of the former hospital, near the airport and near existing public schools.

Polaris Tech is a state-approved charter school to serve middle and high school students from Jasper County and the Lowcountry.

It is a free school with no tuition that will focus on preparing young people for successful work.

State of the Schools to be held Nov. 1

The Beaufort Regional Chamber has rescheduled its annual State of the School event due to Tropical Storm Irma.

It will be held from 8-9:30 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 1, at Holiday Inn & Suites, 2225 Boundary St.

South Carolina Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman and the leaders from the area school systems will share information concerning education in Beaufort County and the impact on the local community.

Speakers will include Spearman, Dr. Jeffrey Moss, superintendent of the Beaufort County School District; Dr. Richard Gough of the Technical College of the Lowcountry; and Dr. Al Panu of the University of South Carolina Beaufort.

Guests will also hear from a panel of leaders representing the area’s private and charter schools including: Beaufort Academy, Bridge Preparatory School, Holy Trinity Classical Christian School, John Paul II High School, Lowcountry Montessori School, Riverview Charter School and St. Peter’s Catholic School.

The cost is $20 for chamber members; $25 for nonmembers; and $160 for a table of eight.

Contact LaNelle at LaNelle@BeaufortSC.org.

Local student named to symphony orchestra

Janelle Vernoy of Beaufort was recently named to the 2017 Bob Jones University Symphony Orchestra (BJUSO).

Vernoy is a junior majoring in Church Music.

“It’s been great to welcome so many new members this year,” said conductor Michael Moore. 

“In addition to our music majors, we have several very talented musicians majoring in accounting, communications, computer science, education, health sciences, graphic design and Christian ministries.”

USCB scores major grant by national foundation

in School News/Schools by

The University of South Carolina Beaufort has been awarded a grant of nearly $900,000 by the National Science Foundation to support a statewide initiative to boost advanced materials research and production, build capacity in existing industries and to place more highly skilled workers in high-tech jobs.

The USCB grant, for $898,037, is part of a $20 million, five-year Research Infrastructure Improvement Track-1 award from the NSF to a statewide consortium of 10 institutions of higher education. The goal of the consortium is to position South Carolina as a leader in advanced materials manufacturing and to boost the state’s production capabilities in the field. 

The NSF grant will enable the 10 academic institutions, encompassing more than 100 teachers and 600 students, to collaborate on an initiative called the Materials Assembly and Design Excellence in South Carolina or MADE in SC. 

USCB’s role in the initiative is to work with faculty and students in the other academic institutions on the computational aspects of the Modeling and Computational Core of the MADE in SC program. The computational core is the foundation of the proposed research. It provides an “integrating focus” for the entire project, according to the MADE in SC website. 

USCB will use its federal grant to plan a Master of Science program in Computational Science at the university and to establish a Computational Engineering track of study in the undergraduate Computational Science program. As part of this effort, it will hire three tenure-track Computational Science faculty members, two of whom are to have considerable experience in engineering. With the three new hires, the USCB faculty will have eight Computational Science teachers. 

Two of USCB’s Computational Science faculty members, Yiming Ji, Ph.D., and Xuwei Liang, Ph.D., will work with the new members of the Computational Science faculty and undergraduate students to design modeling and testing software to be used for computer-simulated testing and iterative design of new materials, thus speeding up the design process. 

The three new faculty members will develop courses and curricula, will teach courses, and will serve as research mentors to students who participate in modeling, simulation and visualization of the Modeling and Computational Core aspects of the initiative. The first new hire will develop and teach undergraduate courses in Computational Science with an engineering emphasis. The latter two will develop new courses and the curriculum for the master’s program.

Ji, the program director for USCB’s participation in the initiative, is a professor of Computational Science and interim chair of the Department of Mathematics and Computational Science at USCB. He is the director of the university’s Computational Science Program. He was named a “Rising Star” by the Office of Research and Graduate Education at the University of South Carolina system in 2010. 

The latest NSF grant is the second major funding initiative for Ji and USCB. Before this latest grant, Ji secured more than $1.6 million in grant and education funding, which was used to hire four Computational Science tenure-track faculty members, to establish a Computational Core facility, and to create a Bachelor of Science degree program in Computational Science. More than 100 students are enrolled in the program today.

“I feel very honored by this latest grant,” said Ji. “We are making a significant research contribution to the State of South Carolina. Creating a master’s program in Computational Science at USCB will have a tremendously important impact for many years to come. The long-term impact on our students will be the most important thing.”

School briefs for October 19th-25th

in School News/Schools by

Foundation surprises schools with cash awards

Supporters and board members of the Foundation for Educational Excellence visited 14 Beaufort County schools this week to surprise 19 teachers with grant awards.

The teachers, recipients of the foundation’s fall Innovative Teacher Grants, were presented with balloons and oversized checks.

The 18 grants ranged from $179 to $1,500 and totaled more than $10,000.  The foundation said the awards will provide innovative learning opportunities for more than 4,000 students districtwide.  

Funded projects include reading, coding and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics), musical arts performances and a pollinator garden.

Established in 2007, the foundation awarded its first grants in 2009. Twice each year, grants of up to $750 are awarded to individual teachers and up to $1,500 for team requests. Thousands of students have benefitted since 2009. The $10,000 awarded this week brings the foundation’s giving to over $180,000 since grants were first awarded in 2009.

In Northern Beaufort County, Beaufort High’s Nancy Ungvarsky and Deborah Kidd were awarded $1,500 for its project called Back to Native: Pollinator Garden.

Eve Weaver of Robert Smalls International Academy was awarded $419.96 for a project called Magnetic Math and Engineering and $246.48 for Geometry in Motion: Integrating Art and Math with Origami.

John Cullinen of Battery Creek High was awarded $571.22 for Infrared Photography: Beyond the Visible Light Spectrum.

Christopher Crabb and Nicholas Glick of Mossy Oaks Elementary were awarded $1,100 for a project called Disney’s Mulan Jr.

Shelley Krebs of Port Royal Elementary was awarded $320.79 for Critical Thinking with Games.

Alexis Hines of Beaufort Middle was awarded $750 for Foundations in Personal Finance.

Melissale Rivera of Shanklin Elementary was awarded $250 for A Snapshot of Me!

High school seniors focus of application day

Beaufort County high school seniors received one-on-one coaching recently as they prepared college applications with help from school counselors, parents, community volunteers and representatives of colleges and universities.

College Application Day, a joint project of the Beaufort County School District, the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education and the South Carolina Department of Education, provides coaching and advice to students at all of the district’s high schools as they fill out actual college applications online.

“Applying for college isn’t a simple thing,” said Superintendent Jeff Moss. “The complexity of the process can be pretty intimidating, so we provide coaches who work with students one on one during the day.”

84.9 percent qualify for national certificates

Beaufort County School District high school students outperformed their peers from across South Carolina on a key statewide exam during the 2016-17 school year, according to data released by the South Carolina Department of Education.

South Carolina requires all 11th-graders to take WorkKeys exams each spring, and students who post qualifying scores earn “portable” certificates at the Bronze, Silver, Gold or Platinum levels that can be used to qualify for good-paying jobs anywhere in the nation.  

Increasing numbers of businesses require job applicants to have WorkKeys certificates.  

Among Beaufort County 11th-graders, 84.9 percent scored high enough to earn a certificate (Bronze, Silver, Gold or Platinum), compared to 84 percent of 11th-graders statewide.  

That marked a decrease from last year, when 87.6 percent of district 11th-graders scored high enough to earn a certificate compared to 86.8 percent statewide. 

Looking at students earning Silver certificates and above, 63.3 percent of Beaufort County 11th-graders qualified in 2016-17 compared to 60.8 percent statewide. A score of Silver or better was adopted by the South Carolina Education Oversight Committee last month as one measure of a career-ready student in high school.

Superintendent Jeff Moss said that many businesses across the nation now use WorkKeys certificates as prescreening tools for job applicants. 

“It’s a skills and knowledge measurement system that’s consistent nationwide,” he said, “so businesses can rely on it no matter where they’re located.  And it works for our high school students, too, because it lets them know what they need to concentrate on if they hope to land good-paying jobs.”

Moss said that a variety of work-based experiences are available for Beaufort County students, and the district is working with local business and industry partners to expand and enhance those opportunities.

State submits plan for student success

The South Carolina Department of Education (SCDE) announced that it has submitted its Consolidated Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) plan to the U.S. Department of Education.

“This submission is the culmination of thousands of hours of hard work and collaborative effort by the people of South Carolina,” said State Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman.

“Our plan is designed to move student achievement forward and the time is now to get to work on making that happen and ensuring our graduates are prepared for success.”

For over a year, the SCDE collaborated with parents, teachers, school and district administrators, education advocates, and business and community leaders to create a multiple measure education system that provides students with a rigorous system of instruction that leads to high quality learning opportunities and academic outcomes.

School board, local activists go on attack

in Local News/School News/Schools by

By Sally Mahan

A string of toxic emails between board of education members over comments made by the chairman that critics of the board will “die and go to hell” also revealed that one had told another that she hoped “she would die or fall off a cliff.”

The exchange started when local activist and former school board member Jim Bequette emailed members of the media and school board members that Beaufort County School District board of education Chairman Earl Campbell, who represents District 1 in Northern Beaufort County, should resign from his post on the board.

At an Oct. 3 board meeting, Campbell, who has served on the board for more than 20 years, said, “Sometimes people get their blood pressure up staying negative, but you will die and go to hell and these kids will still be here and some of us will still be here.” 

He appeared to be targeting Citizens Advocating Responsible Education (CARE), a group of local activists who have been critical of the board and the district administration. 

“I let my statement stand,” said Campbell. “I am a school board member and represent District 1, but I also represent every student in this county. People only want to talk about the negative and I can’t just sit back and let that happen.

“We have good teachers, good students and good staff and the negativity affects some of our employees. 

“It’s kind of funny that people want to criticize but can’t take criticism. We have a lot of good things going on in our district,” said Campbell

CARE members have said the board is dysfunctional and that Superintendent Jeffrey Moss should step down from his post due to ethics issues, including a past incident of nepotism. 

Moss received his annual evaluation on Oct. 9 and was given a “satisfactory” grade in a 6-4 vote by the board.

After Bequette sent his email on Oct. 9, in which he said, “If (Campbell’s) statement was sent or made publicly, he should resign immediately,” a chain reaction of back-and-forth emails among local activists and board members got underway.

JoAnn Orischak, who represents District 11 on Hilton Head Island, responded to Bequette, saying, “And I thought my public comments raised eyebrows. …”

Evva Anderson, who represents District 6 in the southwest Beaufort County, took offense, writing back to Orischak, saying, “You are quick to criticize … yet you sit by and allow your friend (Richard) Bisi (a member of CARE) to curse in our meetings and say nothing. That says volumes.”

Orischak wrote back, “Just a little humor, Evva. Trying to lighten the mood a bit. … As a reminder, our board policy does not permit board members to directly respond to, or have exchanges with, speakers during public comment. No matter how spirited a commenter may be, I try to follow this rule; however, there have been many times when I would have liked to respond. …

“While we are at it, and what is even more disconcerting than the use of the ‘Hell’ word, is that YOU were overheard saying that you’d wish I would ‘die or fall off a cliff.’ It’s one thing to think this, but it’s quite another to utter it aloud.

“One might consider this a threat to one’s personal safety. But I’ll bet you were just interjecting a bit of humor,” Orischak wrote.

Meanwhile, activists and CARE members were not amused.

Bisi wrote, “You have a lot of nerve Ms. Anderson. In the last two years, I have attended 39 school board meetings and have spoken 35 times in those meetings. One time, when I was so frustrated over the audit debate, did I say, ‘What the hell is going on?’ ” Bisi wrote.

“Your reply was that ‘children might be watching’ and your friend, Bill Payne, muttered under his breath but was picked up by the microphone, ‘That was vulgar.’ 

“And yet the school board chair can dismiss ALL of the district critics by telling them ‘they will die and go to hell.’ Are you kidding me?

“Mr. Campbell should resign his chairmanship and should resign his seat on the board,” Bisi wrote. “His remarks are simply outrageous and unbecoming that of a school board chair.”

Board member Anderson did not respond to a request for comment on her exchange with Orischak or Bisi’s charges.

Board member Orischak did respond to a request for comment by saying, “Mr. Campbell is a good man; so obviously, I am disappointed in his comments to community members. 

“It’s not the profanity that disturbs me (if you can label ‘Hell’ profanity), it’s the intent and spirit of the statement that is problematic, particularly for a board chairman. I would not be surprised if Mr. Campbell apologized on his own without any board intervention.”

As far as Anderson’s comments about falling off a cliff and dying, Orischak said, “You can verify Mrs. Anderson’s comments with board members and others who overheard. As a side note, Mrs. Anderson continues to show up at my meetings with constituents, which is concerning given her comments toward me.”  

Meanwhile, other activists are calling for the head of Campbell.

Activist Geri Smith said, “Please add me to the list of citizens requesting you (Campbell) resign, not only from the chair, but as board representative for District 1 as well. In my opinion, while under your leadership the board continues to bring shame, embarrassment and ridicule upon the board of education and the school district. I find your content of
character lacking.”

Board member David Striebinger, who represents District 2 in northeast Beaufort County, was dismayed by the emails.

“I suggest we stop these ‘fanning the flames’ email exchanges,” he said. “They serve no useful purpose. These emails display how deep the problems on the board run … at a personal level. 

“What started with inappropriate comments by the chair has expanded to acrimonious exchanges between other board members,” said Striebinger. “This is not problem solving. A simple apology by the chair would close the issue out, but these exchanges do the opposite … they broaden the issue.”

School board election

Former Beaufort County School District board of education member Patricia Felton-Montgomery was elected to represent portions of Bluffton in November 2016 and was subsequently named chair of the board. However, she resigned in June.

A special election will be held Tuesday, Oct. 17, to fill her seat. Only voters in that district can cast a ballot. The candidates are John Dowling and Susan Gordon.

School briefs for October 12th-18th

in School News/Schools by

State of the Schools to be held Nov. 1

The Beaufort Regional Chamber has rescheduled its annual State of the School event due to Tropical Storm Irma.

It will be held from 8-9:30 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 1, at Holiday Inn & Suites, 2225 Boundary St.

South Carolina Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman and the leaders from the area school systems will share information concerning education in Beaufort County and the impact on our community.

Speakers will include Spearman, Dr. Jeffrey Moss of the Beaufort County School District; Dr. Richard Gough, Technical College of the Lowcountry; and Dr. Al Panu, University of South Carolina Beaufort.

Guests will also hear from a panel of leaders representing the area’s private and charter schools including: Beaufort Academy, Bridge Preparatory School, Holy Trinity Classical Christian School, John Paul II High School, Lowcountry Montessori School, Riverview Charter School and St. Peter’s Catholic School.

The cost is $20 for chamber members; $25 for nonmembers; and $160 for a table of eight.

Contact LaNelle at LaNelle@BeaufortSC.org.

Bridges educator is Teacher of the Month

Grace Converse is shown here with Mark Robertson and Brain Balance reps. Photo provided.
Grace Converse is shown here with Mark Robertson and Brain Balance reps. Photo provided.

It was a day to remember for Bridges Prep kindergarten teacher Grace Converse. WYKX 98.7 The River radio station and Bluffton’s Brain Balance surprised her and her students in their classroom recently to award her their first-ever Teacher of the Month.

Her winnings included an Amazon Echo, a gift card for school supplies and lunch for the entire class.

“It was an amazing surprise, and to have my kids be part of it in the classroom was so fun,” Converse said.

Converse was among the first teachers hired at Bridges Prep when the school opened in 2013. She was named the school’s Teacher of the Year for 2015-2016. She graduated Magna Cum Laude from Erskine College with a bachelor’s degree in early childhood and earned her master’s degree in education with an emphasis on literacy from the University of West Georgia.

Prior to joining Bridges Prep, Converse taught at Sias International University and as a second-grade teacher. Interestingly, she is married to Ashton Converse, who was Teacher of the Year for 2016-2017 at Bridges Prep.

“Grace is an amazing teacher who creates such a connection to our youngest learners,” said Dee Matthews, chair of the Bridges Prep board of directors and a longtime educator herself. “Grace is pretty much the ideal for a kindergarten teacher in my mind, and we are proud and privileged to have her with us at Bridges Prep.”

WYKZ radio personality Mark Robertson presented the award along with a bundle of balloons in Converse’s kindergarten class. She was the initial winner in a three-month recognition of local teachers sponsored by the radio station and Brain Balance Achievement Center in Bluffton.

To learn more about Bridges Preparatory School, visit www.bridgesprep.org or call 843-982-7737.

Department of Ed releases test results

The South Carolina Department of Education has released the results of 2017 statewide assessments for SC READY, SC PASS and End-of-Course assessments.

SC READY assessments in English language arts and mathematics are designed to measure progress of students in grades 3-8 toward South Carolina’s new, more rigorous academic standards and higher expectations.  

SC Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman said last year that adopting rigorous standards and accompanying assessments would require an adjustment by students, parents and teachers as educators and students transition to a more challenging academic environment.

In 2017, Beaufort County students outperformed the state in all grades in mathematics and in three of six grades in English language arts.  

South Carolina made scoring changes to the SC Ready scale in 2017, so comparisons between the two years are being done cautiously.  For example, a fourth grade student in 2016 on the English language arts assessment that scored in the 25th percentile was “Approaches Expectations.”  

A similar student in 2017, fourth-grade scoring in the 25th percentile on the English language arts assessment, is “Does Not Meet Expectations”.

In SC READY English language arts:

• Grade 3: 41 percent met or exceeded state standards compared to 42.1 statewide. An additional 32.4 percent of district students “approached” meeting state standards.

• Grade 4: 42 percent met or exceeded state standards compared to 40.9 statewide. An additional 30.1 percent of district students “approached” meeting state standards.

• Grade 5: 42.3 percent met or exceeded state standards compared to 38.3 statewide.  An additional 31.5 percent of district students “approached” meeting state standards.

• Grade 6: 42.3 percent met or exceeded state standards compared to 39.7 statewide.  An additional 35.1 percent of district students “approached” meeting state standards.

• Grade 7: 35.1 percent met or exceeded state standards compared to 36.4 statewide.  An additional 34.6 percent of district students “approached” meeting state standards.

• Grade 8: 38.8 percent met or exceeded state standards compared to 40.1 statewide.  An additional 32.6 percent of district students “approached” meeting state standards.

In SC READY mathematics:

• Grade 3: 55.3 percent met or exceeded state standards compared to 52.5 statewide. An additional 23.5 percent of district students “approached” meeting state standards.

• Grade 4: 52.1 percent met or exceeded state standards compared to 46.4 statewide. An additional 27.6 percent of district students “approached” meeting state standards.

• Grade 5: 44.1 percent met or exceeded state standards compared to 40.0 statewide. An additional 30.4 percent of district students “approached” meeting state standards.

• Grade 6: 43 percent met or exceeded state standards compared to 41.5 statewide. An additional 33.3 percent of district students “approached” meeting state standards.

• Grade 7: 36.2 percent met or exceeded state standards compared to 33.3 statewide. An additional 35.4 percent of district students “approached” meeting state standards.

• Grade 8: 37.3 percent met or exceeded state standards compared to 34.5 statewide. An additional 33.7 percent of district students “approached” meeting state standards.

SC PASS results for 2017

South Carolina students in grades 4-8 have taken SC PASS assessments in science and social studies since 2009.  Science scores were converted to SC READY performance levels in 2017, making social studies the only assessment comparable across multiple administrations.

In SC PASS science:

• Grade 4: 47.4 percent met or exceeded state standards compared to 48.4 statewide. An additional 28.9 percent of district students “approached” meeting state standards.

• Grade 5: 43.8 percent met or exceeded state standards compared to 46.1 statewide. An additional 23.2 percent of district students “approached” meeting state standards.

• Grade 6: 45.9 percent met or exceeded state standards compared to 48.0 statewide. An additional 23.0 percent of district students “approached” meeting state standards.

• Grade 7: 44.5 percent met or exceeded state standards compared to 46.5 statewide. An additional 23.4 percent of district students “approached” meeting state standards.

• Grade 8: 49.9 percent met or exceeded state standards compared to 49.5 statewide. An additional 22.8 percent of district students “approached” meeting state standards.

Beaufort County students’ performance on SC PASS social studies exams improved in one of the five grade levels tested and improved relative to statewide averages in three of five grade levels tested:

• Grade 4: 81.1 percent met or exceeded state benchmarks in 2017 compared to 80.9 last year (80.8 percent statewide).

• Grade 5: 64.8 percent met or exceeded state benchmarks in 2017 compared to 71.9 last year (70.9 statewide).

• Grade 6: 75.1 percent met or exceeded state benchmarks in 2017 compared to 75.1 last year (73.3 percent statewide).

• Grade 7: 58.4 percent met or exceeded state benchmarks in 2017 compared to 70.4 last year (63.5 statewide).

• Grade 8: 64 percent met or exceeded state benchmarks in 2017 compared to 65.1 last year (67.7 percent statewide).

Looking at five-year trend data for SC PASS social studies, Beaufort County and statewide scores have decreased in all
grades tested.

End-of-course exams

For the first time Beaufort’s percent of students passing EOCEP exams surpassed the state in all four subject areas.

For the 2016-2017 school year, two major changes affected EOCEP results:  

• South Carolina adopted a new 10-point grading scale that impacts the scores of all four subject areas tested.

• Algebra I and English I scoring was rescaled to match the rigor of SC College & Career Ready Standards. Rescaled scoring contributed at least partially to fewer students passing the Algebra I exam and more students passing the English I assessment.

Due to these changes, the 2016-2017 EOCEP mean score and percent passing results in Algebra I and English I can’t be compared to results from prior years.

South Carolina students’ scores on end-of-course exams count for 20 percent of final grades in Algebra 1, English 1, Biology and U.S. History and Constitution. 

• Algebra I: The percentage passing was 77.5 in 2017 (state passing percentage was 74.7).

• English I: The percentage passing was 81.4 in 2017 (state passing percentage was 76.8).

• Biology: The percentage passing increased from 79.8 in 2016 to 80.9 in 2017 (state passing percentage was 73.7).

• U.S. History and Constitution: The percentage passing improved from 73.3 in 2016 to 73.4 in 2017 (state passing percentage was 67.8).

“Our students and our progress is more than one data point in time and should be reflective of the work we are doing in our district working with our community and teachers in preparing graduates to be successful after graduation,” said Superintendent Jeff Moss. 

Reading, arts focus on district TV show 

Reading and the arts are being featured in the Beaufort County School District’s “Our Schools” television program, which is airing on the County Channel.

About 1,500 students benefited from additional teacher-led assistance through the district’s Summer Reading Program, which will be the focus of the show’s first segment.  

In the second segment, three principals will discuss their schools’ arts-focused instruction and their recent grant awards from the South Carolina Arts Commission.  Six district schools – the second-highest number in the state – earned 2017 Arts in Basic Curriculum grants.

Appearing with Superintendent Jeffrey Moss on the new edition of “Our Schools” will be Carmen Dillard, director of Elementary Education; Melissa Murray, English Language Arts coordinator; Taylor McGillis, a teacher at Hilton Head Island Elementary; Carole Ingram, principal at Beaufort Middle School; Gretchen Keefner, principal at Hilton Head Island School for the Creative Arts; and Marvelle Ulmer, principal at Lady’s Island Elementary School.

“Our Schools” is a partnership between the school district and the County Channel.

“Our Schools” airs four times weekly: at 11:30 a.m. Mondays, 9 p.m. Tuesdays, 8:30 p.m. Thursdays and 12:30 p.m. Saturdays.  

The broadcast will air on local cable networks: Comcast’s Channel 2, Hargray’s channels 9 and 113, and Spectrum Channel 63.  

The show also will air at those times on the County Channel’s website at www.bcgov.net/departments/Community-Services/county-channel/index.php.

In addition, the show will be archived and can be watched any time at the same link.

Redemption will be topic of seminars

Dr. Janice B. Brown, a retired professor of English and author of “The Seven Deadly Sins in the Work of Dorothy L. Sayers,” will deliver a three-part seminar series entitled, “The Mystery of Redemption,” while serving as a visiting teacher of literature at Holy Trinity Classical Christian School in October and November. The lecture series is free and open to the public.

Brown, a finalist for the 1999 Edgar Allan Poe Award for her book on Sayers published the previous year, will present the first lecture in the series at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 19, at the school at 302 Burroughs Ave.

The initial lecture, “The Mystery of Evil: The Whodunit and the Gospel,” encompasses the depiction of sin in Sayers’ fiction, and the spiritual significance of detective stories. 

The second lecture, “The Mystery of Suffering: World War II and the Redemptive Function of Suffering,” is Sayers’s war-time writing. It applies the pattern of the cross to the pattern of the times. It will be presented at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 2.  

The last lecture in the series, “The Mystery of Redemption: Choosing to be the Chosen of God,” looks at the necessity of preaching of Christ crucified and the way God’s initiative in conversion is depicted in three of Sayers’ ecclesiastical plays. It is scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 9.

Brown was professor of English at Grove City College in Pennsylvania from 1994 to 2015. She earned two bachelor’s degrees, a master’s degree and a doctorate at Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada. Located in St. John’s, Newfoundland, and Labrador, Memorial University is one of the top comprehensive universities in Canada and the largest university in Atlantic Canada. 

The highlight of her career, Brown says, was the six-and-a-half-year period she spent teaching high school English at Ukarumpa High School in Papua New Guinea. It is a school for the children of missionaries operated by Wycliffe Bible Translators. From 1986 to 1991, she served as an adjunct lecturer in English Language and Literature at Memorial University.

Her book, “The Seven Deadly Sins in the Work of Dorothy L. Sayers,” explores the world of the artist who worked in many genres and addressed many issues. 

In 2018 Kent State University Press will publish Brown’s second book, “The Lion in the Waste Land: Fearsome Redemption in the Work of C.S. Lewis, Dorothy L. Sayers, and T.S. Eliot.” Kent State University Press published her first book in 1998.

BA gets new director of financial services

Virginia Henneberry
Virginia Henneberry

Virginia Henneberry has been named the new director of Financial Services at Beaufort Academy.

She has worked in education for nearly 14 years – both in K-12, and higher education, in areas ranging from alumni retention to athletics, facilities management and procurement. 

She has spent the last nine years in administration and operational support roles for the Beaufort County School district, most recently as office manager for Whale Branch Early College High School.

As the daughter of an educator, she developed an early appreciation for school as a community, and the important role each teacher, staff member and administrator play in the education and well being of their students. 

Originally from Macon, Ga., Henneberry has been part of the Beaufort community since June 2007. In her free time she enjoys spending time with her family, riding bikes, and playing in the yard with her daughters and dogs (and a cat who thinks she is a dog). She also enjoys relaxing in the mountains, traveling and singing.

Holy Trinity raises funds for sister school

Holy Trinity Classical Christian School students and their families have been fundraising in support of the school’s “Join the Journey” fall fundraiser.

In Biblical tradition, Holy Trinity will be tithing 10 percent of proceeds raised to their sister school in South Sudan, Good Shepherd Academy (GSA). GSA’s headmaster, Rev. John Chol Dauu, will be arriving from South Sudan and joining in Holy Trinity’s celebration and Prayer Walk. 

The walk will be held from 9-10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 14, at the school at 302 Burroughs Ave. in Beaufort.

School briefs for October 5th-11th

in School News/Schools by
robotics

Photo above: Beaufort Academy’s robotics team attended workshops that accompanied the release of the 2017-2018 FIRST Tech Challenge game recently at the Military Magnet School in North Charleston. The rookie team, made up of students in grades 7-12, was able to elevate a marshmallow 19.5 inches on a stable platform made from string, spaghetti and tape in a timed team-building exercise. Photo provided.

Make-up dates have been changed

Because of student testing at several schools on Saturday, Dec. 9, that cannot be rescheduled, the previously scheduled weather make-up day for all students is being moved back one week to Saturday, Dec. 16.  

This means that the Beaufort County School District’s two weather make-up days related to Tropical Storm Irma will now be Saturday, Nov. 18, and Saturday, Dec. 16.

AP students earn free college credits

More than half of Beaufort County School District students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses in 2016-17 scored high enough on their final exams to earn free college credits, the College Board reported recently. 

Advanced Placement – and the accompanying College Board exams that demonstrate mastery of the course material – let students earn free college course credits while still in high school.  

Last school year, 54 percent of Beaufort County School District students taking AP exams scored 3 or better on the tests’ 5-point scale, qualifying them for college credit.  

That was down slightly from the previous year’s 55 percent, which was the district’s all-time high, but up significantly from 48 percent five years ago.

Across the district, 525 individual students scored high enough to earn college credits compared to 538 last year and 537 five years ago.  

The total number of exams taken was 1,480, up from 1,374 last year and down from 1,707 five years ago.

Superintendent Jeff Moss said that fewer students are taking AP courses because more are taking advantage of “dual enrollment” courses that also allow them to earn college credits while still in high school through partnerships with colleges and universities.

“Either way you look at it – whether it’s dual enrollment or AP courses – our students are setting higher standards for themselves, and that’s certainly encouraging,” Moss said.

Among Northern Beaufort County public high schools over the past five years:

• Battery Creek High: Thirty-one percent of students taking AP exams scored high enough for college credit in 2016-17, down from 43 percent the previous year and up from 13 percent five years ago.

• Beaufort High: Fifty-two percent scored high enough for college credit in 2017, compared to 49 percent the previous year and 55 percent five years ago.

• Whale Branch Early College High offers college courses through its partnership with the Technical College of the Lowcountry rather than offering AP courses through the College Board.

Students with autism to benefit from robots

Fifteen school districts across South Carolina, including Beaufort County, will implement the Milo robot and Robots4Autism curriculum beginning this October.

“I am excited about the opportunities that Milo and Robots4Autism curriculum bring to our students with Autism Spectrum Disorders,” said State Superintendent Molly Spearman.

“Through the use of this state-of-the art technology, we can provide intense support to the academic and social behavioral needs of a growing population of students in our state.”

Since 2011, the number of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in South Carolina has nearly doubled from 4,000 to over 8,000 students in 2017. Recognizing the need to provide an evidence-based curriculum for students with ASD and the need to support educators, the Office of Special Education Services invested in Milo and through the use of federal funds will pilot the humanoid robot and curriculum in 15 districts for a three-year period.

Developed by RoboKind, a company based in Dallas, Milo teaches elementary and middle school students the understanding and meaning of emotions and expressions, and demonstrates appropriate social behavior and responses. 

Through interactions with Milo, students learn to tune in on emotions, express empathy, act more appropriately in social situations, self-motivate and generalize in the population.

Each robot can assist up to 15 individual students with ASD by providing a minimum of 60 minutes weekly of special education services related to behavior, pragmatic speech or social/emotional learning.

Information sessions set for Polaris Tech charter

Eight community and parent information sessions are set across Jasper County over the next six weeks to share details and how to apply to the Lowcountry’s newest state charter school, Polaris Tech.

The public sessions typically last about an hour and include an overview of the school, what makes it different, and how to apply starting in January.

Polaris Tech is scheduled to open in August 2018 as a free public charter school for up to 250 middle and high school students. As a state charter school, the Polaris Tech board of directors will be responsible for meeting state guidelines and accountability measures.

Most meetings have Spanish translation. 

Visit www.polaristech.org for times and locations.

Local students enroll; others study overseas

Joseph Crayton, of Beaufort, has enrolled as part of the Class of 2021 at Marietta College for the Fall 2017 semester.

Meanwhile, Michael Christian Bass, of Beaufort, is spending the semester in Switzerland. Bass is a member of the class of 2019.

Natalie Hudson Simkins, of Beaufort, is spending the semester in Barcelona, Spain. Simkins is also a member of the class of 2019.

State of the Schools to be held Nov. 1

The Beaufort Regional Chamber has rescheduled its annual State of the School event due to Tropical Storm Irma.

It will be held from 8-9:30 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 1, at Holiday Inn & Suites, 2225 Boundary St.

South Carolina Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman and the leaders from the area school systems will share information concerning education in Beaufort County and the impact on our community.

Speakers will include Spearman, Dr. Jeffrey Moss of the Beaufort County School District; Dr. Richard Gough, Technical College of the Lowcountry; and Dr. Al Panu, University of South Carolina Beaufort.

Guests will also hear from a panel of leaders representing the area’s private and charter schools including: Beaufort Academy, Bridges Preparatory School, Holy Trinity Classical Christian School, John Paul II High School, Lowcountry Montessori School, Riverview Charter School and St. Peter’s Catholic School.

The cost is $20 for chamber members; $25 for nonmembers; and $160 for a table of eight.

Contact LaNelle at LaNelle@BeaufortSC.org.

New admissions director named at BA

Becky Bekemeyer
Becky Bekemeyer

Becky Bekemeyer has been named director of admissions at Beaufort Academy.

Bekemeyer, a native of Beaufort, is a registered nurse and received her Associate Degree of Science in Nursing in 2001. She most recently has been a labor and delivery nurse for the past 11 years, but previously worked in adult and pediatric nursing for five years.

She has been married to Jonathan Bekemeyer for 15 years, a current lieutenant with the Lady’s Island-St Helena Fire District who also works for the Fripp Island Fire Department.

Bekemeyer is replacing MJ Simmons, the admissions director at BA for the past seven years. 

“I know Becky will take care of our wonderful current and future families of Beaufort Academy,” said Simmons. “Becky is a great fit for the position with her detail oriented skills, and her knowledge of our school. We hope you have the opportunity to come meet her in the front office in the near future.”

Contact Bekemeyer at at bbekemeyer@beaufortacademy.org, 843-524-3393 or visit www.BeaufortAcademy.org for more information.

Local students are attending The Citadel 

The Citadel is welcoming the Class of 2021, which includes the following local students:

Briona Gray, Matthew Hurtt, Jakob Marsh, Dianna Munford, Jacob Ramseur  and Kenneth Spurlock, all of Beaufort.

In other Citadel news, Nicolas Cucinotta, of Port Royal, was awarded Gold Stars by The Citadel for earning a grade point ratio of 3.7 or higher during the 2017 spring semester. Students that achieve Gold Star recognition are also placed on The Citadel’s Dean’s List.

Digital Corridor to offer game design class 

The Beaufort Digital Corridor is launching Game On, a code education program geared toward middle and high school students who would like to learn the practice of game design and development.

Game On will introduce students to the theory, tools and practice required to create their own games. The six-week course will be taught by Seth Konoza, a Games, Computer Graphics and Animation educator from Beaufort High School.

This course will be held from 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays from Oct. 14-Nov. 18 at the Beaufort Digital Corridor’s BASEcamp facility.

Visit beaufortdigital.com.

Local students attend leadership program

in School News/Schools by
four

Photo above: From left are Clayton Ruff, May Harrelson, Will Warren and John Manos, who are displaying their certificates from the 2017 Palmetto Boys-Girls State Encampment. Photos provided.

From left are American Legion Post 207 Auxiliarians Jamesetta Inabinett, Ernestine Norman, Kim Holms and Alice Gaskins joining Chuck Lurey of Post 9 to congratulate May Harrelson for attending Palmetto Girls State Encampment.
From left are American Legion Post 207 Auxiliarians Jamesetta Inabinett, Ernestine Norman, Kim Holms and Alice Gaskins joining Chuck Lurey of Post 9 to congratulate May Harrelson for attending Palmetto Girls State Encampment.

Staff reports

American Legion Beaufort Post 9 sponsored three young men and the Samuel J. Bush Post 207 Auxiliary Unit sponsored two young ladies, all five local high school rising seniors, to South Carolina’s Palmetto Boys and Girls State encampments in June. 

Palmetto Boys State’s 1,050 participants gathered at Anderson University; while the Palmetto Girls State’s 640 young women met at Presbyterian College in Clinton. 

John Manos of Beaufort High School was elected mayor of his mock city, Congaree. “I learned an overwhelming amount about elections, winning and losing, and how many great future politicians there were,” he said.

Another attendee, Clayton Ruff, also of Beaufort High, hoped “that even more Beaufort boys have an opportunity to attend such a great week.” 

Will Warren of Beaufort Academy added that having already studied the structure and function of government, Boys State “made it very real for me in ways that a classroom never could.” 

May Harrelson of Beaufort High said Girls State “was a life-changing experience and a real eye opener on just how many really intelligent young women are in South Carolina.” 

Sarah Suber, also of Beaufort High, added that she “made so many friends and connections while attending Girls State.”

Boys State was first held in June 1935 in Illinois. South Carolina began to host the program in 1940. 

The American Legion founded the Boys State program to teach young men about government and politics. More specifically, the program is intended to spark interest and pride in government on a local level as well as the national scope. 

The greatest aspect of the program is that the participants learn by doing. Active participation in Boys State is key.

Palmetto Girls State is a one-week leadership and citizenship training program, created to educate outstanding high school students about state and local government and citizenship. 

Girls attending Palmetto Girls State experience governmental procedure by simulating political campaigns, elections and the political process. They also learn about the principles of citizenship and public service from guest speakers, expert panels and staff members.

The delegates, who are rising seniors in high school, are selected for the program based on the leadership skills and involvement they have shown in their respective schools and communities.

The South Carolina Department of the American Legion Auxiliary has organized and administered Palmetto Girls State since 1947. 

For more information, visit palmettoboysstate.com/about-palmetto-boys-state and palmettogirlsstate.net.

Sarah Suber and May Harrelson attended the 2017 Palmetto Girls State Encampment.
Sarah Suber and May Harrelson attended the 2017 Palmetto Girls State Encampment.
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