Review Category : School News

Favorite Teacher Award

Winning Orthodontic Smiles presented Holy Trinity’s Josiah Tobin (left center) $100 for classroom supplies after student, Parker Smith entered him in the Favorite Teacher Contest held in the Beaufort office of Dr. Skeet Burris and Dr. Travis Fiegle. Representing Winning Orthodontic Smiles is Janet Villalta (left) and Tiera White (right).

Winning Orthodontic Smiles presented Holy Trinity’s Josiah Tobin (left center) $100 for classroom supplies after student, Parker Smith entered him in the Favorite Teacher Contest held in the Beaufort office of Dr. Skeet Burris and Dr. Travis Fiegle. Representing Winning Orthodontic Smiles is Janet Villalta (left) and Tiera White (right).

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TCL honors nursing program graduates

The Technical College of the Lowcountry will hold its nursing pinning ceremony Thursday, December 18 at 1 p.m. in the MacLean Hall Auditorium, 921 Ribaut Road, Beaufort.

Thirty-four associate degree in nursing program graduates will be recognized. In the last five years, more than 200 students have completed the associate degree in nursing program.

TCL’s two-year ADN program prepares graduates to practice as registered nurses. Students experience on-campus learning using high-tech simulation equipment and receive intense additional hands-on practice at clinical sites located throughout Beaufort, Jasper, Hampton and Colleton counties.

“The TCL nursing program in particular is rigorous but produces extremely qualified and successful graduates, giving them the confidence they need to walk proudly into the nursing field,” nursing program director Sharon Beasley said.

For more information about the TCL health sciences programs, please visit www.tcl.edu/health or call 843.525.8267.

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Latest news from Beaufort Academy

• BA is once again partnering with FWDG (Furniture Warehouse Design Gallery) for the annual Coat Drive.  Donations are being collected at school until Friday, December 19.

• Friday, 12/19: The last day to sign up to have the Senior Class haul away your Christmas Tree.  Haul away date is January 4.  The sign up form can be found at the BA website, www.beaufortacademy.org, on the calendar.

• Friday, 12/19: The sixth and seventh grade BA Latin students will be caroling at Bayview.

• Monday, 12/22: No school, Christmas Break begins.  Students will return to school on Monday, January 5.

The Beaufort Academy Chess Team participated in two tournaments in the last two weeks.  The first was the Bethesda Academy Chess Tournament on December 6, 2014. In the Elementary Division, BA fourth graders Kendra Rogers and G Simmons placed first and second, respectively. BA fourth grader Jack McDougall participated in his first Middle School Division and placed first, going 5-0. BA sixth grader Kevin Rogers participated in the High School Division. The second was the Golden Isles Scholastic Chess Association Chess Tournament on December 13, 2014. BA second grader Whit Suber finished first in the Primary Division, going undefeated at 5-0. BA fourth graders Kendra Rogers, G Simmons and Jack McDougall placed third as a team in the Elementary Division. BA sixth grader Kevin Rogers once again played in the High School Division. Pictured above, left to right: Kendra Rogers, G Simmons, Coach Darrin Rogers, Jack McDougall, Kevin Rogers, and future BA chess player Kelvin Rogers.

The Beaufort Academy Chess Team participated in two tournaments in the last two weeks. The first was the Bethesda Academy Chess Tournament on December 6, 2014. In the Elementary Division, BA fourth graders Kendra Rogers and G Simmons placed first and second, respectively. BA fourth grader Jack McDougall participated in his first Middle School Division and placed first, going 5-0. BA sixth grader Kevin Rogers participated in the High School Division. The second was the Golden Isles Scholastic Chess Association Chess Tournament on December 13, 2014. BA second grader Whit Suber finished first in the Primary Division, going undefeated at 5-0. BA fourth graders Kendra Rogers, G Simmons and Jack McDougall placed third as a team in the Elementary Division. BA sixth grader Kevin Rogers once again played in the High School Division. Pictured above, left to right: Kendra Rogers, G Simmons, Coach Darrin Rogers, Jack McDougall, Kevin Rogers, and future BA chess player Kelvin Rogers.

The ninth graders at BA had a project culminating a novel unit on “The Old Man and the Sea” by Ernest Hemingway. In the story, an unlucky old man hooks the largest marlin ever seen by him in all his years of fishing. The fish is so large, that he pulls the old man out to sea. Since the line between Santiago (the old man) and the marlin represents life, a life and death struggle ensues. They are both desperate to win. Santiago continuously talks to the marlin. He felt he was his brother, respected him as a worthy opponent, and loved him. The marlin never responded. The students were to give the marlin a voice. What was he experiencing in this battle? The marlin was at the top of his game, huge, beautiful, but hooked. They were alone at sea, connected. Only one contender would win the prize — Life. Above: Will Warren and Emily Potter with two of the Marlins designed by the class.

The ninth graders at BA had a project culminating a novel unit on “The Old Man and the Sea” by Ernest Hemingway. In the story, an unlucky old man hooks the largest marlin ever seen by him in all his years of fishing. The fish is so large, that he pulls the old man out to sea. Since the line between Santiago (the old man) and the marlin represents life, a life and death struggle ensues. They are both desperate to win. Santiago continuously talks to the marlin. He felt he was his brother, respected him as a worthy opponent, and loved him. The marlin never responded. The students were to give the marlin a voice. What was he experiencing in this battle? The marlin was at the top of his game, huge, beautiful, but hooked. They were alone at sea, connected. Only one contender would win the prize — Life. Above: Will Warren and Emily Potter with two of the Marlins designed by the class.

 
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Junior Honor Society Toy Drive

The National Junior Honor Society at Lady’s Island Middle School recently held a toy drive to support the United States Marine Corps Reserve.  Those students pictured with some of the toys that were collected for this year’s drive. A special thank you to Ms Lori Howell and Ms Kim Brown for helping this drive be a success this year. Back Row, from left: Taylor Maddox, Skye Pejsa, Nicole Marsh, Keara White, Amelia Evans, Sydney Maddox, Quentin Butler, Chase Guynup, Riley Kase, Max Kase, Jacob Denton. Front Row, from left: Sara Correll, Niquava Pope.

The National Junior Honor Society at Lady’s Island Middle School recently held a toy drive to support the United States Marine Corps Reserve. Those students pictured with some of the toys that were collected for this year’s drive. A special thank you to Ms Lori Howell and Ms Kim Brown for helping this drive be a success this year. Back Row, from left: Taylor Maddox, Skye Pejsa, Nicole Marsh, Keara White, Amelia Evans, Sydney Maddox, Quentin Butler, Chase Guynup, Riley Kase, Max Kase, Jacob Denton. Front Row, from left: Sara Correll, Niquava Pope.

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Lady’s Island Elementary performs holiday show

Lady’s Island Elementary School brought down the house with its annual Holiday Performance on Thursday, December 4 at 6:30 p.m. at the Beaufort High School Auditorium.  Character dances based on “The Nutcracker” were performed by the second, third, fourth and fifth grade advanced dance students. Students in grades second through fifth sang many holiday favorites such as “Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer” and “Jingle Bell Rock.” Fifth grader Alyssa Hines performed a solo rendition of “Away in a Manger,” and “Silent Night” was performed by a quintet comprised of Cinye Brown, Kalysse Rivers, Jamayah Bellinger, Maliyah Holmes and Heaven Jenkins.

 

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Jade singing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tahje

 

 

 

 

Alyssa singing

 

 

 

Camryn

 

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Port Royal Elementary listed on National Register of Historic Places

Port Royal Elementary School’s placement on the National Register of Historic Places was officially recognized today when a plaque was unveiled at the school by town and school district officials.

Beaufort County Board of Education Chairman Bill Evans, Superintendent Jeff Moss and Port Royal Elementary Principal Chavon Brown joined Town of Port Royal officials who had coordinated the national recognition effort.

A unanimous vote last year by the 15-member South Carolina Board of Review for the National Register of Historic Places sent Port Royal’s nomination to the U.S. National Park Service, which made the final decision.  The state review board comprises architects, historians, archaeologists and public officials from across the state.

Historic Port Royal Foundation President Jim Crower (left) and Port Royal Elementary School Principal Chavon Brown uncover a plaque designating the school’s historic status at ceremonies on Saturday, Dec. 13.

Historic Port Royal Foundation President Jim Crower (left) and Port Royal Elementary School Principal Chavon Brown uncover a plaque designating the school’s historic status at ceremonies on Saturday, Dec. 13.

The national nomination effort was coordinated by the Town of Port Royal, the Historic Port Royal Foundation and the Beaufort County School Board.  The delegation that attended last year’s state review board meeting prior to the nomination included Town Manager Van Willis, town council members Joe Lee and Tom Klein, Board of Education Chair Bill Evans and school Assistant Principal Clay Fowler.

While the exact opening date of Port Royal Elementary is not known, the handwritten deed that transferred the property from the town to the school district is dated September 1910.  The building’s cornerstone indicates that it was constructed in 1911, and the school celebrated its 100th birthday in 2011.  The original building held six classes in three classrooms, as well as a library with three bookshelves.

Historian and preservationist Eric Plaag said that the building has both architectural and historical significance.

“The original Port Royal school was designed by Wilson and Sompayrac, an architectural firm that was famous in South Carolina back around the turn of the century, and that 1911 building is still essentially intact,” Plaag said.  “There were additions made in 1954 and 2002.”

Plaag said the school’s historical significance involves the confluence of two major transitional events in the 1950s: the American military build-up during the Cold War and South Carolina’s efforts to maintain segregated schools by building “separate-but-equal” schools for African-American students.

“The school district used federal impact aid money to expand the Port Royal school and accommodate growing numbers of military families moving into the area,” he said.  “Then it used state money to build ‘equalization schools’ outside of Port Royal to serve African-American students.”

“Separate-but-equal” schools were later ruled unconstitutional in the landmark U.S Supreme Court decision, Brown v. Board of Education.  A South Carolina case, Briggs v. Elliott, was the first of five state-level cases combined into the Brown decision.

“This is an exciting day,” said Town Councilman Klein. “Port Royal has a rich and colorful history, and our community’s century-old school is a living symbol of that history.  This national designation validates that it’s something worth protecting.”

School Board Chairman Evans said the district was pleased to partner with town officials in the designation effort.

“Port Royal Elementary enjoys tremendous support from the town,” Evans said, “and that support is a key reason for its success.”

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Retailer makes surprise visit to Beaufort Elementary School

Dollar General officials made a surprise visit on Thursday, Dec. 11, to Beaufort Elementary School, and they carried with them a yellow-and-black box.  When school leaders opened the box in front of a classroom of curious students, they were elated to find a check for $40,000.

“Dollar General is very passionate about its mission of serving others, and we are all excited to surprise Beaufort Elementary School with a donation to further their reading and literacy programs,” said Gary Sinclair, Region Director for Dollar General. “We hope this donation will help equip the school with the tools and resources it needs to improve the learning experience for students.”

Dollar General’s donation is part of its Reading Revolution program, which aims to provide schools with additional resources to purchase books, computers and other educational supplies to enhance their reading and literacy programs.

Beaufort Elementary was chosen by Dollar General due to its close proximity to the company’s Robert Smalls Parkway store, one of the largest contributors to the Dollar General Literacy Foundation through its Cash Cube program.

“By supporting Beaufort Elementary School with this gift, we hope to help students become better readers, more successful students and lifelong learners,” said Denine Torr, Dollar General’s director of community initiatives.

Beaufort Elementary Principal Gary McCulloch said that his hands were shaking when he opened the box decorated with Dollar General’s trademark yellow and black colors.

“This is obviously an incredible day for our school,” McCulloch said.  “Our goal is to provide kids with the kinds of reading resources that spark their interest and keep them excited, and our teachers are ecstatic about the opportunities this wonderful donation opens up.”

McCulloch said the school will use the money to buy books and other reading materials designed to appeal to a variety of reading levels.

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Two middle school principal appointments among district moves

The appointments of principals at two middle schools were among a package of administrative moves announced last week by the Beaufort County School District.

Neodria Brown, an assistant principal at Hilton Head Island High School, will be principal of Hilton Head Island Middle School.  Chad Cox, currently an assistant principal at Robert Smalls International Academy, will be principal of Whale Branch Middle School.  Both appointments become effective on Jan. 5.

“Ms. Brown and Mr. Cox have solid leadership skills and administrative experience,” said Superintendent Jeffrey Moss. “They know what it takes to operate a successful school, and they also can relate well to students, parents and community members.”

Greg Stickel, current principal at Hilton Head Island Middle School, will become an assistant principal at Lady’s Island Middle School, while Matthew Hunt, current principal at Whale Branch Middle, will become an assistant principal at Hilton Head Island School for the Creative Arts.  Current Lady’s Island Middle Assistant Principal Greg Hall will become an assistant principal at Robert Smalls International Academy.

Neodria Brown is a nine-year education veteran who began her career in Durham, N.C. teaching science to seventh- and eighth-graders before becoming a principal intern. She moved to Hilton Head to become an assistant principal in 2012.

Chad Cox is an 11-year education veteran who began his career as a social studies teacher at Battery Creek High School before becoming an assistant principal there.  Since then, he has also served in assistant principal positions at Whale Branch Early College High and Robert Smalls International Academy.  Cox has a bachelor’s degree in secondary education from Clemson University and a master’s degree in school administration from Cambridge College.

Reginald Deas, assistant principal at Hilton Head Island School for the Creative Arts, has been named as the district’s personnel director.  In his new role, the veteran educator will supervise day-to-day personnel operations.

Deas began his 25-year career in Savannah, Ga, where he served as a teacher and athletics coach at two middle schools and two high schools.

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Lowcountry Montessori students take creative writing workshop

By Wendy Nilsen Pollitzer

Recently, I had the pleasure of teaching a creative writing workshop at Lowcountry Montessori School for secondary students in the school’s immersion program.

Front row, from left: Avery Frier, Megan Wells, Sierra Weaver, Payton Utsey, Izzy Yeager and Natashe Solis. Back row, from left: Jade Hoff, Alex Clark, Chelsea Miley, Chloe McElveen and Sarah Webb.

Front row, from left: Avery Frier, Megan Wells, Sierra Weaver, Payton Utsey, Izzy Yeager and Natashe Solis. Back row, from left: Jade Hoff, Alex Clark, Chelsea Miley, Chloe McElveen and Sarah Webb.

Eleven young girls, ages 12-15, practiced writing techniques and exercises to develop their skills at descriptive writing. At the end of the workshop, I gave the students instructions to write a short story in 300 words or less. The only direction was to write about a boat with four passengers and an event that occurred while the boat passed under the Richard V. Woods Memorial swing bridge in downtown Beaufort. The stories were diverse yet consistently graphic of our beloved coastal home.

When I read the stories aloud after the 45-minute exercise, we all agreed that, given minimal direction, writers have the ability to create an infinite amount of situations and plots based on one constant. The invariable in this exercise was geographic location. Even though the stories were completely different, they were comparable in the description of the view surrounding the bridge.

These young girls expressed an impressive level of enthusiasm for writing. Thank you for an affirmation that creative minds yield open minds.

The Editor of The Island News, Pamela Brownstein, and I chose one short story to publish to congratulate an exceptional writer at Lowcountry Montessori School, Alex Clark.

Panic under a bridge

By Alex Clark

“I awoke one morning to see the beautiful colors in the sky. The oranges, reds and pinks filled my soul with comfort. I got up from my plush, comfortable bed and went outside to the helm. My sleep eyes wandered to the marsh where I saw my favorite bird, a Great Blue Heron. His soft, white chest feathers blew slightly into the breeze as he hunted for crabs in the soft, salty Lowcountry mud. I suddenly heard a rustle downstairs as my husband and two children awoke from their slumber. My nose was wonderfully aroused by the smell of coffee as my husband began to fry bacon.

My morning was finally starting to take action after my family and I ate breakfast. My husband, Sean, started to pull up the anchor while I got the sail ready, and my children, Autumn and Taylor, quietly played downstairs with our little dog, Tina. The wind gusted just enough to make us start moving. The breeze was chilly against my skin, but it kept our little boat moving just enough. We got closer and closer to our destination. All we had left to pass was a bridge.

The journey so far had been so much fun, and if we could just get passed the bridge, we’ll be there. As we neared the bridge, my heart began to beat harder and faster. My mind began to run with fear. The mast was too tall. But it was too late … we couldn’t turn around. I got on the radio and tried to stay calm as I called the bridge operator, but I wasn’t fast enough.  My ears heard an awful crunch. It sounded terrible, like a thousand bones cracking at once. Panic struck, and I began to cry.

Then I woke up.

I awoke to those beautiful morning colors I knew so well. I was thankful that terrible dream was over, and I was safe in my relaxing little boat.”

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