Review Category : Health

TMD: A constant companion you’d be better off without

By Dr. Stephen Durham

Nearly one-third of people suffer from TMD — temporomandibular disorder. It’s a poor alignment of the jaw and the muscles around it.  Studies suggest TMD causes 92% of headaches, and as many as three quarters of us may have the disorder and not know it.

That’s because TMD comes masked in such a variety of pains and discomforts.  Neck aches, sleep disorders, poor posture, numbness in the shoulders and down the arms, dizziness, a ringing in the ears — even migraines — are just some of the symptoms of TMD.

Because it appears in so many different costumes, TMD is sometimes called “the great pretender.” The bad news is that treating the symptoms doesn’t address the real cause.  The good news, though, is that once we identify TMD, the solutions are as unique and individual as the patient.

We use a computer program to help us determine each person’s unique “ideal bite,” the alignment that relaxes neck and jaw muscles and makes teeth work efficiently.  A measuring technique called EMG shows exactly how each muscle is firing.  It’s based on the same technology doctors use to make an EKG.  With this graph the path of the bite becomes clear. We also make a scan called a CMS, and together these two tests show us how the muscles are working — 3D and in real time.

Creating “the ideal bite”

The muscles that pull the jaw shut are anchored throughout the neck and skull.  The path those muscles take is the key ingredient in both the cause and cure of TMD.

From the data we get in EMG and CMS images we record a model that shows your ideal bite, and we sculpt a comfortable orthotic – a guide that will bring the jaw to the right alignment.  We fit that guide and fine-tune it.

It begins with saying, “enough.”

In many cases people with TMD have been biting that way all their life — ever since their permanent teeth came in.  Discomfort and even pain have become routine for many folks. People tell us sometimes that they forgot it was possible to feel better.

So treatment for TMD is highly successful, but becoming aware of it presents the greatest difficulty for most people. Using a custom-built orthotic trains the bite and relaxes the muscles.  For many people it opens the door to a better quality of life.

At our practice we make that as easy as possible because of all the good that begins with bringing it to light.

Dr. Durham practices at Durham Dental at Town Center in Beaufort. For more information, visit www.DrStephenDurham.com or call 843.379.5400.

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Beaufort Memorial Hospital retains Pathway to Excellence designation

Beaufort Memorial Hospital once again has earned the prestigious Pathway to Excellence designation in recognition of its nurse-friendly work environment.

“It’s a really big deal to be a Pathway to Excellence hospital,” said Karen Carroll, Beaufort Memorial’s chief nursing officer and vice president of patient care services. “It substantiates the professional satisfaction of nurses and identifies best places to work.”

BMH was the first South Carolina hospital to achieve the designation in 2011. To remain a Pathway to Excellence hospital, you have to reapply every three years. Only 119 hospitals in the country currently hold the Pathway to Excellence title.

Established in 2007 by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), the national program was developed to improve both the quality of patient care and the professional satisfaction of nurses by improving the workplace environment.

“When nurses feel empowered, satisfied and engaged, they perform better,” Carroll said. “And it goes beyond just nurses. Many of the standards required to earn the designation affect all of our employees.”

In May, the hospital submitted a 1,860-page report to the ANCC, providing the organization with evidence BMH has continued to meet the 12 rigorous standards essential to creating a healthy workplace for nurses. As part of the extensive review process, nurses were asked to respond to a confidential online survey verifying the hospital follows the prescribed practices and policies.

To meet the requirements of the ANCC, 51 percent of all RNs and LPNs in the hospital had to complete the questionnaire. BMH had 73 percent participation. At least 75 percent of the responses had to be favorable to earn the Pathway to Excellence designation.

Earning the distinction — and maintaining it — is no small feat. It took a team effort to complete the lengthy application.

“Since we applied three years ago, they’ve tightened the standards and raised the bar,” said nurse Susie Roos, who spearheaded the reapplication effort for BMH. “They increased the amount of evidence we are required to provide them by 30 percent.”

Roos and her team spent months preparing the nearly 2,000-page report.

“Now that we’re on this pathway, it self-perpetuates,” Roos said. “This time around, we had a plethora of evidence.”

To learn more about Beaufort Memorial Hospital, visit www.bmhsc.org. For information on job opportunities, click the “Careers” tab.

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Beaufort Memorial Hospital and Parris Island Fire Department put new stroke program to the test

In preparation for the stressful holiday season, Beaufort Memorial Hospital and the Parris Island Fire Department ran a drill earlier this week to test a new telemedicine stroke system designed to provide rapid diagnosis and treatment of patients suffering from the debilitating condition.

Beaufort Memorial Hospital Emergency Department physicians Drs. Luke Baxley and Steven Larson ready with the Telemedicine Cart used to consult with MUSC.

Beaufort Memorial Hospital Emergency Department physicians Drs. Luke Baxley and Steven Larson ready with the Telemedicine Cart used to consult with MUSC.

The Web-based program — called REACH for Remote Evaluation of Acute Ischemic Stroke — allows ER physicians in Beaufort to consult with neurologists at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston on a moment’s notice to determine if a patient is having a stroke.

Giving patients clot-busting drugs within one hour of their arrival in the ER is crucial to minimizing brain damage and speeding recovery.

“We have three great neurologists in Beaufort, but it’s difficult for them to be available in our Emergency Department 24/7,” BMH stroke coordinator Sheri O’Brien said. “With the telemedicine program, we can reach a stroke care expert in minutes.”

Last Monday morning, a young, healthy firefighter from the Parris Island Fire Department played the role of a 65-year-old man who was having trouble speaking and showing weakness in his right arm and leg.

Recognizing the symptoms of a stroke, Parris Island Fire Department rescue workers provided emergency treatment and notified BMH that they were bringing in a possible stroke patient. By the time they arrived at the hospital, the ER team had hooked up the telemedicine cart and alerted the various hospital departments involved in treating

Parris Island Fire Department arrives at BMH with stroke patient.

Parris Island Fire Department arrives at BMH with stroke patient.

stroke patients to be at the ready.

The patient was quickly taken to the imaging department for a CT scan, a test that can show bleeding in the brain or damage to brain cells from a stroke.

“It takes an average of 10 minutes to get an MUSC neurologist online,” O’Brien said. “In the time it took to complete the CT, the doctor was paged and at the cart waiting.”

After virtually examining the patient and the imaging results, the neurologist determined he was having an ischemic stroke, caused when an artery that supplies oxygen-rich blood to the brain becomes blocked. The patient was immediately treated with clot-busting medication.

If the artery had leaked or ruptured, causing a hemorrhagic stroke, the patient would have been airlifted to MUSC for more advanced treatment.

Beaufort Memorial’s ER typically handles 250 stroke cases each year. Since BMH joined the REACH program Sept. 9, emergency physicians have used the telemedicine cart 19 times.

“Time is so important with a stroke,” O’Brien said. “The faster you can get diagnosed and treated, the better the outcome.”

Parris Island EMS staff in room providing information and history of patient to ER nurses while nurse at cart inputting information for physician at MUSC.

Parris Island EMS staff in room providing information and history of patient to ER nurses while nurse at cart inputting information for physician at MUSC.

 

Stroke symptoms include a drooping face, weakness in an arm or leg, difficulty speaking or understanding, trouble seeing in one or both eyes, loss of balance and a sudden severe headache.

“Call 9-1-1 immediately if you observe any of the symptoms,” O’Brien said. “And note the time of the first symptom. It’s important information that can affect treatment decisions.”

Preparing patient for CT scan.

Preparing patient for CT scan.

 

 

 

 

Nurse awaiting physician from MUSC to sign on to Telemedicine cart (physician will appear on screen in front of patient).

Nurse awaiting physician from MUSC to sign on to Telemedicine cart (physician will appear on screen in front of patient).

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Beaufort Memorial Hospital purchases Surgery Center of Beaufort

Beaufort Memorial Hospital has purchased the Surgery Center of Beaufort with developing plans to expand the outpatient multi-specialty surgical facility in the future.

Opened in 2000, the ambulatory surgery center has a staff of 40 physicians that includes four general surgeons, seven anesthesiologists and specialists in ear, nose and throat, gastroenterology, gynecology, ophthalmology, oral surgery, orthopedics, pain management, podiatry and urology. The physicians perform an average of 450 procedures a month in the state-of-the-art facility.

The Surgery Center of Beaufort is located near Beaufort Memorial Hospital at 1033 Ribaut Road, Beaufort.

The Surgery Center of Beaufort is located near Beaufort Memorial Hospital at 1033 Ribaut Road, Beaufort.

BMH already owned 40 percent of the center, located just a quarter mile north of the hospital’s main campus at 1033 Ribaut Road. Most of the doctors practicing at the surgery center also are members of Beaufort Memorial’s medical staff.

“We’ve been involved with the surgical center from day one,” said Beaufort Memorial President and CEO Rick Toomey. “Having full ownership of the facility gives us the ability to consider making strategic capital investments to expand outpatient surgical services at the center and provide the community with a cost-effective and patient-friendly environment for minor procedures.”

Today, more than 80 percent of U.S. surgeries are outpatient. Many surgeries that required complex procedures and overnight stays just a few years ago are now being performed in ambulatory surgical centers.

“Our focus is solely on surgery, so we’re able to offer high-quality, professional care delivered in the most efficient, cost-effective manner possible,” said Surgery Center of Beaufort Director Carolyn Evec. “Patients find the smaller setting to be more personal, convenient and comfortable. We are excited to be a part of the Beaufort Memorial Hospital system and know our patients and staff will benefit from the additional resources.”

Licensed by the state, the surgery facility is also certified by the Center for Medicare/Medicaid Services to provide care for its members.

“The surgery center has an excellent staff covering a wide range of specialties,” Toomey said. “We hope to expand the future capacity of the facility to allow more surgeries to be relocated from the hospital to the center.”

For additional information on the Surgery Center of Beaufort, visit www.beaufortsurgery.com.

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Junior Service League of Beaufort to host blood drive Dec. 15

The Junior Service League of Beaufort, an organization of women committed to volunteerism, will host its annual winter blood drive from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Dec. 15 at The Blood Alliance.

Anyone can participate in the drive, including first-time donors. Each pint donated can save three lives. The league has set 45 units as its goal this year, which will help 135 people. The Blood Alliance must collect 36 units of blood every day to meet the needs of patients at the hospitals and other medical facilities it supplies.

As part of the blood drive, the league will also collect donations of paper goods for Citizens Opposed to Domestic Abuse and the Child Abuse Prevention Association, two nonprofits league members volunteer with throughout the year. Both organizations need paper towels, paper plates, toilet paper, tissues and feminine hygiene products.

“The league is excited to offer this opportunity to give back to our community during the holiday season,” blood drive project chair Amy Lane said. “Because The Blood Alliance is Beaufort Memorial Hospital’s sole supplier of blood, donors are helping their neighbors, friends and family members when they give.”

To donate through the league’s drive, participants must mention the league when donating on Dec. 15. Appointments can be made to contribute to the drive by calling 888-99-TBA-HERO (888-998-2243) or visiting www.igiveblood.com. A government-issued photo I.D. is required to donate. The Blood Alliance is located at 1001A Boundary St., Beaufort.

League members have worked together to help women, children and families in Beaufort and the surrounding communities since the league was founded in 2005. The league has donated more than $100,000 to area nonprofits since its founding and has also provided local young women with prom dresses through the league’s signature service project, The Prom Boutique.

For more information, visit www.juniorserviceleagueofbeaufort.org, email jslbft@yahoo.com or find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/JSLBFT.

The Blood Alliance December Drives

• Thursday, December 4: Whale Branch Early College High School, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 169 Detour Road, Seabrook

• Friday, December 5: Beaufort County, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Administrative Building parking lot, 100 Ribaut Road Beaufort.

• Wednesday, December 10: Battery Creek High School, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., 1 Blue Dolphin Dr., Beaufort

• Friday, December 19: Beaufort Memorial Hospital, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Beaufort Medical & Administrative Center (BMAC) 990 Ribaut Road, Beaufort.

• Monday, December 22: Beaufort Memorial Hospital, 2 to 8 p.m., Birthing Center entrance parking lot, 955 Ribaut Road, Beaufort.

• Monday, December 29: Beaufort Memorial Hospital

10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Lowcountry Medical Group, 300 Midtown Drive, Beaufort.

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Give the priceless gift of life this year by donating blood

There is a gift that you can give this Christmas that costs you nothing, but can save a life. It takes only about an hour of your time, is almost painless and is priceless.

Yes, this gift is a donation of blood at the next Carteret Street United Methodist Church-sponsored American Red Cross Blood Drive on Thursday, December 4 in the Fellowship Hall (408 Carteret Street, Beaufort) from noon until 6 p.m.

American Red Cross blood is distributed regionally and throughout the world — wherever needed most — and is a source for blood used by the U.S. military services and natural disasters around the world.

To make an appointment, please call 1-866-611-7137 or log onto www.redcross.org/blood (it’s very simple). For the 1-866 number, after you get an answer press 2 (Option 2) for a Savannah-based operator to make your appointment.

Please remember to eat at least two hours before donating and reduce intake of tea and sodas at least one day before donating so that you can pass the “iron” test; drinking lots of water is also suggested. WebMD suggests these foods among others to boost iron in your blood: Red meat; egg yolks; dark, leafy greens (spinach, collards); dried fruit (prunes, raisins); iron-enriched cereals (a bowl of Frosted Mini-Wheats has 90% of your RDA of iron) and grains; beans, lentils, chick peas and soybeans; and artichokes.

For questions, please call Merle Hoagland at 522-2073 or e-mail merle13@embarqmail.com.

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Choose safe toys this holiday season

By Mark S. Siegel

No one chooses gifts with the intent to harm, but some popular children’s toys can cause serious injuries.

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, nearly 257,000 toy-related injuries were treated in emergency rooms in 2013, and almost half of these injuries affect the head or face. In fact, about 1 in 10 children’s eye injuries treated in the ER trace back to toys. Unfortunately, most of these injuries happen to children under age 15.

“You’ll shoot your eye out”

Some propelling toys, like airsoft guns, arrows, BB guns, paintball guns and darts can be particularly hazardous, with the potential to cause serious eye injuries such as corneal abrasion, hyphema (bleeding inside the eye), traumatic cataract, increased intraocular pressure and even permanent vision loss.

The good news is that following a few toy safety tips can easily prevent most eye injuries.

Top Toy Safety Tips:

• Avoid purchasing toys with sharp, protruding or projectile parts.

• Make sure children have appropriate supervision when playing with potentially hazardous toys or games that could cause an eye injury.

• Ensure that laser product labels include a statement that the device complies with 21 CFR (the Code of Federal Regulations) Subchapter J.

• Along with sports equipment, give children the appropriate protective eyewear with polycarbonate lenses. Check with your eye doctor to learn about protective gear recommended for your child’s sport.

• Check labels for age recommendations and be sure to select gifts that are appropriate for a child’s age and maturity.

• Keep toys that are made for older children away from younger children.

• If your child experiences an eye injury from a toy, seek immediate medical attention.

Have a safe and happy holiday!

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BMH Foundation provides ‘slice of pie’

The Beaufort Memorial Hospital Foundation dished up an early Thanksgiving treat to representatives of the hospital departments being awarded funding next year — a real slice of pie.

The primary purpose of the first-ever “Come Get Your Slice of the Pie” celebration was to review the process of accessing grants from the Foundation and to ask recipients for their help in documenting the ways the money will be used to better care for patients.

“What they shared was truly heart-warming” said BMH Foundation Executive Director Alice Moss.  “There was a compelling need behind each request, and it was wonderful to hear first-hand what a difference these Foundation grants would make in patient care”

BMH Foundation Executive Director Alice Moss (far right) serves up a “slice of the pie” in terms of Foundation grants to several BMH department representatives. Pictured here enjoying both their pie and their funding are: (front row) Danielle Williams, Daniel Mock, Veronica Smalheiser, Chris Nietert; (second row) Kassie Moore, Marla Slock, Diane Razo, Mark Senn, Ronnie Jones, Kelly Hoffman, Alice Moss; (back row) Dana Schroeder, Kevin Kremer, Carrie Confare, Frank Miriello.

BMH Foundation Executive Director Alice Moss (far right) serves up a “slice of the pie” in terms of Foundation grants to several BMH department representatives. Pictured here enjoying both their pie and their funding are: (front row) Danielle Williams, Daniel Mock, Veronica Smalheiser, Chris Nietert; (second row) Kassie Moore, Marla Slock, Diane Razo, Mark Senn, Ronnie Jones, Kelly Hoffman, Alice Moss; (back row) Dana Schroeder, Kevin Kremer, Carrie Confare, Frank Miriello.

For Fiscal Year 2015, which began October 1, the Foundation Board has already committed to give $537,252 to the hospital for a variety of projects and programs, big and small, including:

• A Dilon 6800 Gamma Camera that will be used to perform molecular breast imaging.  Nuclear medicine can help doctors detect breast cancer at its earliest and most treatable stages.

• Bridge to Home program COPD kits, containing all of the supplies discharged patients will need to help them maintain their health at home

• A blanket warmer for the Emergency Department

• Continuing education software for pediatric nurses, helping to ensure that everyone is up-to-date

• A longed-for replacement “bubble tube” for HealthLink for Children. This floor-to-ceiling interactive sensory device is both calming to children with sensory disorders and a prime motivator for other children receiving care.

The celebration was capped with a decadent display of pies — apple, cherry, pecan, banana cream, and of course, pumpkin, all created by the hospital’s Executive Chef Eric Sayers and his staff.

Everyone left with a boxed up slice of pie and an appreciation for all the foundation does for the hospital and the community.

As a not-for-profit hospital, any net revenue Beaufort Memorial generates is reinvested in the hospital to help ensure that BMH is providing the very best patient care with the most advanced technology.  But with over $20 million spent each year on charity and indigent care, patient revenue alone can’t provide everything that Beaufort Memorial needs to stay cutting-edge in equipment and training.

That’s where the BMH Foundation comes into play. The foundation oversees the management of charitable funds to benefit the not-for-profit hospital. Thanks to gifts of all sizes from the community, the BMH Foundation has been able to support important programs and services and purchase valuable equipment.

“The hospital couldn’t do all that it does without funds from the foundation,” said Rick Toomey, BMH’s President and CEO.

For more information, visit www.bmhfoundationsc.org.

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Cosmetic surgeon offers ‘Blankets for Botox’

When the temperatures started to dip last month, Dr. Audrey Klenke of Pinnacle Plastic Surgery began to worry about the many animals waiting in shelters to find a home. Dr. Klenke, a member of the medical staff at Beaufort Memorial, has two rescue dogs of her own — a bull terrier (Matilda) and a beagle (Jebodiah).

“When I bundle up to walk my dogs, I can’t help but worry about animals that don’t have a warm place to call home,” she said.

Trevor and Audrey Klenke of Pinnacle Plastic Surgery and their rescue dogs, Jebodiah and Matilda. The Klenke’s are kicking off a “Blankets for Botox” promotion on Thursday, Dec. 4 to raise awareness for shelter animals.

Trevor and Audrey Klenke of Pinnacle Plastic Surgery and their rescue dogs, Jebodiah and Matilda. The Klenke’s are kicking off a “Blankets for Botox” promotion on Thursday, Dec. 4 to raise awareness for shelter animals.

Dr. Klenke wanted to find a creative way to do something worthwhile for local animal shelters this year.  So, she and her staff came up with an idea to collect items for shelters by offering customers a special gift. Called “Blankets for Botox,” the concept is simple: anyone who donates a new or gently used blanket or pet toy for a shelter animal, will receive a gift card worth $50 off a Botox treatment of $199 or more.

Pinnacle will kick off the campaign next Thursday, December 4 by inviting the public to bring a blanket or pet toy to their holiday party. The celebration runs from 5:30 to 7 p.m., and guests will be treated to an array of holiday themed refreshments and door prizes. Several furry friends from Palmetto Animal League are expected to attend, as well.

Collection of the supplies will continue through December 23, 2014 at Pinnacle’s Sheridan Park office, 7 Mallett Way in Bluffton, Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. One blanket or pet toy is all it takes to get a $50 gift card that can be used toward a Botox treatment, but it is limited to one gift card per person.

All of the blankets and toys donated will go to Palmetto Animal League (PAL), a private, non-profit, no-kill animal rescue organization, which will share the supplies with local shelters in need.

“We can only take in so many animals from these shelters at a time, so sharing supplies is another way we can help make the animals more comfortable and cared for while they are waiting for a home,” says PAL’s president, Amy Campanini. “These are small rural shelters that have little resources, but big hearts, and they make the most of what they have.”

Pinnacle will also accept other donations — including cash or gift cards to places like Target or Walmart, enabling PAL staff to purchase food and other necessities — however these gifts are not applicable to the special offer.

“This mission is very close to our hearts,” says Dr. Klenke, pointing out that every member of her Pinnacle Plastic Surgery team cherishes at least one family pet — and that she’d have several more if her husband would let her.

“Our goal with Blankets for Botox is two-fold. We want to collect as many blankets as possible to keep our four-legged friends cozy, but we also want to draw attention to the hundreds of animals waiting for a ‘furr-ever’ home this winter.”

For more information about Blankets for Botox, call Pinnacle at 815-6699 or visit PinnaclePlasticSurgeryMD.com. For more information about the Palmetto Animal League, visit PalmettoAnimalLeague.org.

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Pink braces support cancer research

Lisa Garber, center, a breast cancer survivor, presents a $1,000 check from Winning Orthodontic Smiles to Connie Duke, Cancer Program Director for the Keyserling Cancer Center for Breast Cancer Research.  The $1,000 resulted from 200 orthodontic patients sponsoring the fundraiser by wearing pink braces for Breast Cancer Awareness month. Pictured on left is Dr. Travis Fiegle, co-owner of Winning Orthodontic Smiles.

Lisa Garber, center, a breast cancer survivor, presents a $1,000 check from Winning Orthodontic Smiles to Connie Duke, Cancer Program Director for the Keyserling Cancer Center for Breast Cancer Research. The $1,000 resulted from 200 orthodontic patients sponsoring the fundraiser by wearing pink braces for Breast Cancer Awareness month. Pictured on left is Dr. Travis Fiegle, co-owner of Winning Orthodontic Smiles.

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