Review Category : Contributors

The Kelly Clan. Alive and well with a reunion to prove it.

By Lee Scott Like many people across the country, I attended a reunion this summer. Although there are different kinds of reunions, mine was a family reunion and included the celebration of my maternal aunt’s 93rd birthday. She is the last of the four Kelly girls, my mother’s oldest sister. Visiting with her, my siblings, my cousins and the next generation, I was once again reminded of how lucky I am to have been born into the Kelly Clan. We are largely a Catholic Irish group although we have branched off as new blood has been brought into the fold and we are spread out all over the United States. As one of twenty five cousins in my generation, we were thrown together as children and regardless of the fact that we only saw each other for a week or two at a time each year we became friends. Of all the things that my mother and her three sisters passed along was the sense of family. And now as... ...

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Bugs come with life in the Lowcountry

By Lee Scott Lying in the hallway under a plastic cup sits a large Palmetto bug that I just caught. My spouse, who is out working in the yard, has not agreed to come in and kill it and so I was forced to catch it. He, the bug, was running as fast as he could but I managed to trap him. Now two cocker spaniels are being kept out of the hallway because I know one of them will walk over, tip the cup over and let him loose. They are not fast enough to stop him. He is doing circles around the cup seeking a way out. There is enough pile on the carpet that he is still getting air. He gets up every once in awhile and does another circle. I get up from my desk and look at him from a distance. When I moved here, I realized I was going to have to put up with certain things. Long warm winters, a beach nearby, Palm... ...

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Santa Fe, NM – a glimpse into Beaufort’s future

The Rauch Report By Bill Rauch Out of respect for their heritage, and appalled at seeing it eroding, The City of Santa Fe, New Mexico’s leadership passed in the 1990’s an inclusionary zoning ordinance. It was one of the first of these programs in the United States. Feeling its way, Santa Fe has continuously tweaked the program.  The program today calls for twenty percent of all the houses in new developments to be affordable, down from thirty percent before 2009. Developers are exempted from the city’s roads, police, fire and parks impact fees, and they are exempted from the city’s expansion fee and water offset fee for these units. The total savings of forgiven city development fees is about $10,000 per affordable unit, Matthew S. O’Reilly, the city’s Asset Development Office Director explained last week. Developers also receive as a part of the current incentive package a density bonus of about three quarters of a unit for each affordable unit they build. Just as Beaufort was a hundred years ago... ...

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Why I absolutely love getting up at 4:30 a.m.

By Lee Scott  On Wednesday mornings at 4:30 a.m. from May through mid-October, I climb out of bed, get my coffee and prepare for a morning at Hunting Island State Park. My friend Gretchen and I carpool together. We are volunteers for the Hunting Island Sea Turtle Conservation Project and she has been doing it for sixteen years. Under Permit Number 2015-537 we are authorized to conduct nesting surveys, relocate nests, conduct public inventories and rescue and release disoriented sea turtle hatchlings. We are working under a Permit because the loggerheads are protected under the Endangered Species Act. My first morning out on the beach in May, we saw tracks from a Loggerhead Turtle which might have indicated a nest. This is called a crawl.  Sometimes there are false crawls. A false crawl is when the Loggerhead decides that the spot she has chosen is wrong and she heads back out to the water. As a mother who has given birth to two children, I just call it “False Labor”.... ...

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Is it time for you to have cataract surgery?

By Dr. Mark S. Siegel A cataract diagnosis does not typically mean that surgery is required immediately. Cataracts occur as part of the body’s natural aging process and may not change vision significantly in the early stages. Small cataract-related changes may be improved with prescription glasses. But as the cataracts continue to mature over time, they may cause vision loss that can interfere with activities of daily living. Although the prospect of cataract surgery can be intimidating, the procedure itself is the most common elective surgery among Medicare beneficiaries in the United States. Multiple studies have demonstrated that cataract surgery can lead to improved quality of life, reduced risk of falling and fewer car crashes. In addition, one study found that those who had cataract surgery had a 40 percent lower long-term mortality risk than those who did not. The following four questions can help you determine whether or not you’re ready for cataract surgery: Are your cataracts impacting your daily or occupational activities? Symptoms of cataracts include dim, blurry... ...

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The universe is calling — here’s how to answer

By Barbara Alexander How do we hear what the Universe is telling us? Recently a new student asked me, “What can I do to get clearer on what the Universe is trying to tell me?” For those that are attuned to the fact that the Universe can even connect with us, this is an awesome question! It is probably the most valuable life-skill we have in our lives. The best way to find clarity of your soul’s guidance and direction is to create the time for meditation or prayer in your daily practice. You must learn how to hear the subtlety of the level of vibration. But, what if you have difficulty meditating or if what is bothering you is so overwhelming, you can’t get any clarity? The first steps I share with students are practical tools to find that inner connection. It requires that you master the art of quieting your mind so that you can learn how to listen to your heart. There are countless ways to do... ...

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The differences between early birds and night owls

By Lee Scott The world is full of two types of people. The early birds and the night owls. Those that love getting up early in the morning to start their day. And those that like to wake up late and stretch the day out as long as possible. I am an early bird. I love sitting with a cup of coffee in the dark and waiting for the right moment to snap a picture of the sun as it comes up. It is the quiet part of the day when the world is slowly waking up. The night owls love the closing of the day as the sun sets. For them, taking a shower at 8:00 p.m. means you are getting ready for a night out. Night owls like to eat dinner late and spend hours sitting around the table chatting. On the other hand, early birds are taking their showers at 8:00 p.m. just like the night owls, but they are doing it in order to get to... ...

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I’ll teach her how to exist…if I can remember how

By Cherimie Crane Weatherford Fleeting moments of silence are both rare and recently uncomfortable as they can be cause for panic or unwelcome reflection, both equally tied to parenthood. When my pint size partner isn’t sleeping, silence is the quiet before the storm. The rare occasion that she is in another’s care affords free time that is consumed by thoughts of her. Either is just as exhausting as chasing her throughout my day. It is the cruel joke of parenthood. Somehow the stars aligned, technology failed and storms saturated an otherwise overwhelming and overbooked day. Left to my own devices, laundry was done, dogs bathed and what wasn’t available for worry was created as such. There is no quiet as silent as the absence of a child. Unable to turn to technology for pointless perusal, I found myself in an odd predicament. There was interrupted time for thought. Failing to see the point in much needed self-maintenance, I simply sat down. Another odd event that has grown less familiar over... ...

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Exploring the importance of being a safe harbor

By Susan Stone Last Sunday I heard a sermon on Safe Harbors. The talk primarily focused on personal safety and the state of our world at this time. However my mind went on to ponder the question; in what ways can I/we be a safe harbor for others? If someone shares a secret or a personal situation with you, do you honor that trust and keep it to yourself? In the past I have trusted close friends with personal matters, only to hear about it from someone else I know. This lesson of discernment and finding out who your friends really are can be a painful one. On the flip side, there are those who may never trust me again because I thought it wouldn’t hurt to just tell one person…or two. In my ministerial training I was asked to sign an agreement. The promise I made and signed my name to seemed simple enough, but it has been a challenge to keep. Our human nature is a curious one.... ...

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The good that has come from a Beaufort tragedy

The Rauch Report By Bill Rauch The numbers show the difference Beaufort’s Betsey Robinson (1945-2015) made. In 1989 her 13 year-old son, Reynolds, was accidentally shot and killed by a nine year-old neighbor who was playing with his family’s .22 rifle. The tragedy was the impetus for Betsey to take on the cause of children and gun safety. Reynolds’ death, Betsey knew, had been a preventable tragedy and she did not want other families to have to suffer as she and her family had. One life saved would be worth the effort. In 1990, 10 more South Carolina children (aged 0-17) were killed by the accidental discharge of a firearm, according to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control’s (DHEC) statistics. That was the year Betsey set her strategy. From 1990 through 1994, Betsey Robinson crisscrossed South Carolina, traveled up and down the coast to Washington and anywhere someone would listen quietly promoting her Children’s Firearm Protection Act, a proposed new South Carolina state law that would, along... ...

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