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Beaufort honors veterans with parade, more

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Photo above: An unidentified Vietnam veteran finds a friend in the crowd. Photos by Bob Sofaly.

It was a gorgeous day for the Beaufort Veterans Day Parade and Ceremony on Nov. 11. The annual parade, which included marchers, bands and floats, stepped off in downtown Beaufort and wove around downtown to the Beaufort National Cemetery.

A ceremony featured the Parris Island Marine Band at the Beaufort National Cemetery. 

The speaker at the ceremony was Glenn Blackburn, a 27-year veteran of the 101st Airborne Division of the U.S. Army. He is a Purple Heart recipient and is also active with Tee It Up for Troops, the On Course Foundation and the Folds of Honor Foundation.

Emily Kelly waves to the crowd during the annual Veterans Day Parade. Emily’s dad, firefighter Keith Kelly, was driving a fire truck in the parade.
Emily Kelly waves to the crowd during the annual Veterans Day Parade. Emily’s dad, firefighter Keith Kelly, was driving a fire truck in the parade.
Members of VFW Post 207 wave to the crowd
Members of VFW Post 207 wave to the crowd.
Retired Marine Corps Master Sgt. James Handrinos, center, stands front and center on the American Legion float makes its ways down Carteret Street during the annual Veterans Day Parade.
Retired Marine Corps Master Sgt. James Handrinos, center, stands front and center on the American Legion float makes its ways down Carteret Street during the annual Veterans Day Parade.
The Parris Island Marine Band leads the annual Veterans Day Parade on Nov. 11.
The Parris Island Marine Band leads the annual Veterans Day Parade on Nov. 11.

Company delivers gourmet meals straight to your door

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Photo above: Tony Makar and his mother Dolores Ziccarelto team up every Monday to cook lots of gourmet meals to be distributed on Tuesdays.  Here, Ziccarello shows off some organic carrots to be used in a ratatouille dish. Photos by Bob Sofaly.

By Amy Rigard

Almost anyone can appreciate a healthy home cooked meal. When it can be enjoyed without the shopping, prepping, cooking and cleaning typically involved in putting a meal on the dinner table, that’s even better. 

Enter Gourmet on Wheels, a local business that’s been delivering fresh, individually prepared meals to Beaufort County homes since 2009 and is seeing a lot of growth recently.

Gourmet on Wheels isn’t like other meal delivery services advertised online or on TV. 

Rather than receiving a box with individually packaged ingredients for cooking, customers receive fully prepared entrees and sides delivered in containers that can easily be microwaved or frozen for later use. 

Meals are usually large enough for couples to share, and they are cooked with low salt and sugar substitutes. Gourmet on Wheels will be delivering larger family-size meals starting in January 2018.

Tony Makar, who worked for many years as a nursing home administrator and has previous restaurant experience, saw a need to bring healthy meals to those in the community.

The business has grown through the years, and now new moms, busy on-the-go professionals, people recovering from surgery, elderly residents and many others enjoy the gourmet meals cooked by Tony, his “100 percent Italian” mother who comes from Charleston, and a staff who loves to cook.

Prep work for the upcoming week’s meals begins Sunday nights, and Tony and the staff spend their Mondays cooking in the Pleasant Point Plantation club kitchen. Meals are delivered Tuesdays to customers who choose from a menu of options that’s posted online about four weeks at a time. Local delivery is free. 

Many Gourmet on Wheels customers, including Beaufort resident Kit Harley, order meals every week. Harley has been enjoying the individually prepared meals for nearly two years.  

“I live alone, and it’s no fun to cook for yourself,” Harley said. “It’s so nice to have a healthy, really good meal prepared every day.”

For Makar, knowing that his business is making a difference in the lives of area residents is rewarding. He hopes to continue to grow the business and potentially expand one day beyond Beaufort County.  

To view menus and order meals, visit www.beaufortscmealdelivery.com.

Tony Makar, right, opens a plastic dish for his mother, Dolores Ziccarelto. The duo cooks food for their Gourmet on Wheels all day Monday for local distribution on Tuesday.
Tony Makar, right, opens a plastic dish for his mother, Dolores Ziccarelto. The duo cooks food for their Gourmet on Wheels all day Monday for local distribution on Tuesday.
A panne paste bolognese dish is ready to be delivered.
A panne paste bolognese dish is ready to be delivered.

Gullah heritage celebrated

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Photo above: Aunt Pearlie Sue, portrayed by Anita Singleton, was the mistress of ceremonies during the annual Heritage Days celebration at Penn Center. Photos by Bob Sofaly.

Thousands of people from all over the country crowded onto the grounds of Penn Center for the annual Heritage Days on Nov. 11. Those in attendance were treated to good food, good music and live authentic Gullah entertainment from the venerable Aunt Pearlie Sue (Anita Singleton) and the Gullah Kinfolk.

Regina Good of Sumter flips over funnel cakes, a popular favorite at the annual Heritage Days.
Regina Good of Sumter flips over funnel cakes, a popular favorite at the annual Heritage Days.
Attendees of the annual Heritage Days celebration stand and sing “Lift Every Voice and Sing.” The song, also referred to as the “Black National Anthem,” was written as a poem by James Weldon Johnson in 1900 and later set to music in 1905.
Attendees of the annual Heritage Days celebration stand and sing “Lift Every Voice and Sing.” The song, also referred to as the “Black National Anthem,” was written as a poem by James Weldon Johnson in 1900 and later set to music in 1905.
Pvt. Terry James, left, portraying a soldier of the 54th Massachusetts, and Sgt. Gilbert Walker, of the First South Carolina, walked around Penn Center grounds and gave a living history as they answered questions about what it was like being a black Union soldier during the Civil War.
Pvt. Terry James, left, portraying a soldier of the 54th Massachusetts, and Sgt. Gilbert Walker, of the First South Carolina, walked around Penn Center grounds and gave a living history as they answered questions about what it was like being a black Union soldier during the Civil War.

Auditions for ‘America’s Got Talent’ coming to area

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NBC’s ”America’s Got Talent” (AGT) is back on the road looking for the best variety acts the nation has to offer, and will be hosting auditions on Sunday, Nov. 19, at the Savannah International Trade & Convention Center at 1 International Drive in Savannah.

This past summer AGT celebrated its most watched season ever, with an average of 16 million viewers per episode. In addition, the show was a huge social success, garnering more than 2.6 billion views across social media platforms. 

Season 12 saw the crowning of 12-year-old singing ventriloquist Darci Lynne Farmer from Oklahoma City as the AGT winner.  

In addition to the $1 million grand prize, Darci headlined the ”America’s Got Talent” Live stage show inside the PH Showroom at Planet Hollywood Resort & Casino in Las Vegas.  

The sold-out show ran from Nov. 2-5, with additional special guest Season 12 finalists that performed including singer Angelica Hale, comedian Preacher Lawson and dance group Light Balance. 

“America’s Got Talent” continues to get bigger and better each and every year,” said AGT Executive Producer Sam Donnelly. “The show never fails to discover the best and most exciting acts the country has to offer. We literally change lives and make careers on the AGT stage.  

“I encourage anyone who thinks they have a talent worth sharing to audition for this next season.” 

“America’s Got Talent” celebrates acts of any age and any talent. Throughout the history of the show, AGT has discovered and jump started careers for acts such as singer Grace VanderWaal, who went on to release her first EP, titled “Perfectly Imperfect,” which became the highest-selling EP of 2016. 

Additionally, singer Jackie Evancho, who dazzled audiences on the AGT stage, has gone on to release a series of platinum and gold albums with sales of more than 2.5 million in the U.S.

Acts of any age and any talent are encouraged to register at www.AGTAuditions.com. Acts not able to make it to one of the cities can submit an online audition video through this same website.   

Holiday craft market offered Wednesdays

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The Santa Elena Foundation, in partnership with Hank’s Lowcountry She Crab Soup, relaunched its second-annual craft market on Nov. 8 with the holidays in mind. 

The market will be open from 2-6 p.m. every Wednesday until after the new year, and will feature live entertainment, arts and crafts vendors, local food artisans, giveaways and a kid’s craft table. 

The goal of the market is to raise awareness of local artisans and vendors, offer an alternative to big-box holiday gifts and raise money for the foundation’s preservation efforts. 

The event is open to the public and the entertainment, parking and kid’s craft table are free.

The market will be at the corner of Bladen and North streets in downtown Beaufort.

Vendors include The Essential Ed Koterba, Gwen Teas And Hot Chocolate, Hank’s Lowcountry She Crab Soup, Hilton Head Cookie Co., It’s Only Fair, Lee Bees Honey, Solo Verdi Organic Beef, Stevenson’s Produce, The Herb Room and Three Angels.

Give the gift of art

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Are you looking for that special one-of-a-kind Christmas gift? Something funky like a painting of an alligator with a Santa hat … or just beautiful Beaufort-inspired Christmas cards?  

A portion of BAA’s Gallery will be transformed into a winter wonderland full of fine art and crafts especially created for the holiday boutique, which will be held through Sunday, Dec. 31, at 913 Bay St. in Beaufort.

The gallery is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Saturday; and from 12:30-4:30 p.m. Sunday.

Local member artists have been working all year to design unique works of art that they will only show in the holiday boutique. 

Hand-made, old-world Santas are always a hit; a return from a sell-out last year. Also included are small painting scenes of the Lowcountry, new lines of jewelry and the gold painted “auratone” photographs. Santa figures painted on glass and wood have also become a sought-after item.    

One of BAA’s potters also created a new line of small ornamental bowls and vases just for this event.  

Additionally, the Christmas tree will be filled with hand-painted porcelain ornaments as well as very popular hand-crafted oyster angels and dried okra Santas.   

Although the gifts are mainly holiday-inspired, not all the new art will be seasonal. Some of the artists have created new products that will just be available for the holidays. 

All items are entirely the creative work of the artist and one-of -a-kind.  

“It’s a great opportunity to buy original art for a small price,” said Kim Painter, gallery chair. “Items start at $10 and small paintings are available for under $25. Once they’re gone you will have to wait until next year for the 2018 collection.”  

The main gallery will also be exhibiting the work of over 65 local member artists.   

Visit www.BeaufortArtAssociation.com.  

Event will light up the season

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The Festival of Trees benefiting Friends of Caroline is one of Beaufort’s beloved holiday celebrations, and the 2017 Festival continues a tradition that started 30 years ago.  

The festival showcases beautifully decorated trees that are judged for their originality and creativity. 

The event will be held at The Shed at 809 Paris Ave. in Port Royal.

It will kick off with an Opening Gala featuring a silent auction, music, wine, beer and appetizers from local restaurants from 6-9 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 30.

More than 350 individuals usually attend this reception where the trees are previewed prior to opening to the general public on Friday, Dec. 1.

In addition to the Opening Gala, the schedule is as follows:

• 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday, Dec. 1: General admission

• 8 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 2, Yoga in the Trees; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. is general admission; Frozen Day will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. It will include special guest Elsa and Anna from Disney’s “Frozen” from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.; live reindeer Sven and more. General admission is $5 for adults and $3 for children.

• 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 3 is general admission; 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. is Snow Day (with real snow to play in). General admission is $5 for adults and $3 for children.

Additionally, there will be a Christmas treasures for sale, a kids fun zone, a visit from Santa and Mrs. Claus and more.

Friends of Caroline is committed to providing the highest quality care to patients and families of those suffering from a life-limiting illness. 

It is a local, nonprofit, Medicare-certified hospice provider that has been serving people throughout Beaufort County for the past 37 years.  

Adult bereavement and support groups are offered to family members of patients served by Friends of Caroline as well as any member of the community at large who has experienced a loss. 

Donations from individuals, businesses and foundations allow Friends of Caroline to provide hospice care, bereavement and caregiver support services to all individuals in the community regardless of their ability to pay. 

Fun show coming to arts center

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“Shrek The Musical JR.” will be presented by the Beaufort Children’s Theatre at 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 17, and Saturday, Nov. 18; and at 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 19, at the USCB Center for the Arts at 805 Carteret St. in Beaufort.

Beauty is in the eye of the ogre in “Shrek The Musical JR,” based on the Oscar-winning DreamWorks Animation film and Broadway musical.

It’s a “big bright beautiful world” as everyone’s favorite ogre, Shrek, leads a cast of fairytale misfits on an adventure to rescue a princess and find true acceptance.

Part romance and part twisted fairytale, Shrek JR. is an irreverently fun show with a powerful message for the whole family. 

Once upon a time in a far-away swamp, there lived an ogre named Shrek. One day, Shrek finds his swamp invaded by banished fairytale misfits who have been cast off by Lord Farquaad, a tiny terror with big ambitions.

When Shrek sets off with a wisecracking donkey to confront Farquaad, he’s handed a task: If he rescues feisty Princess Fiona, his swamp will be righted. 

Shrek tries to win Fiona’s love and vanquish Lord Farquaad, but a fairytale wouldn’t be complete without a few twists and turns along the way.

Tickets are $20 for adults;; $18 for seniors and military; and $14 for students and children.

Visit www.uscbcenterforthearts.com/shows-and-events.

Lowcountry Life

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This photo of a Lowcountry sunset was taken off the dock at Habersham by Andrea Ogiony.

To submit a Lowcountry Life photo, you must be the photographer or have permission to submit the photo to be published in The Island News. Please submit high resolution photos and include a description and/or names of the people in the picture and the name of the photographer. Email your photos to theislandnews@gmail.com. 

Literary center designated landmark

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The Pat Conroy Literary Center opened its doors to the public in October 2016 during the first annual Pat Conroy Literary Festival.

Following a year of robust educational programming in and beyond the Center’s home in Beaufort, the American Library Association (ALA) has honored the literary center with a national recognition. 

At an Oct. 20 reception held during the second annual Pat Conroy Literary Festival, executive director Jonathan Haupt announced that the literary center was newly designated as an ALA United for Libraries Literary Landmark, only the second in the state of South Carolina.

The ALA’s United for Libraries Literary Landmarks registry was founded in 1986 to honor and promote sites of literary significance nationwide. 

Other Literary Landmark sites include the William Faulkner House in Oxford, Miss.; the Alex Haley Museum in Henning, Tenn.; Ernest Hemingway’s birthplace in Oak Park, Ill.; the Margaret Mitchell Home and Museum in Atlanta; the Dr. Seuss National Memorial Sculpture Garden in Springfield, Mass.; the Eudora Welty Library in Jackson, Miss.; the Tennessee Williams House in New Orleans; the Idlewild Public Library in Idlewild, Mich., which was central to the writing lives of Charles Chestnutt, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, and W. E. B. DuBois; and SC’s first Literary Landmark, the James Dickey Library site at the University of South Carolina in Columbia, which honors one of Pat Conroy’s teachers.

The Conroy Center’s Literary Landmark was coordinated in partnership with the South Carolina Center for the Book, an affiliate of the Library of Congress Center for the Book. 

The landmark plaque was sponsored by two statewide organizations, the South Carolina State Library and the South Carolina Academy of Authors, and by the Public Library Foundation of Beaufort County.  

“South Carolina authors have made numerous contributions to the larger literary landscape. The South Carolina State Library is thrilled that South Carolina’s newest Literary Landmark designation recognizes and honors the many contributions of one of the Palmetto State’s favorite sons, Pat Conroy, and of the Literary Center established in his honor” said Leesa Aiken, South Carolina State Library director. “Conroy’s style continues to shape, influence and encourage both seasoned and blossoming writers, and will for years to come. We all share in South Carolina’s sense of pride and connection to Pat, felt most deeply in his beloved Beaufort, and the Conroy Literary Landmark, like the Conroy Center itself, is a testament to Pat’s continued importance to readers and writers nationally as well as regionally.”

The Pat Conroy Literary Center has previously been recognized as SC’s first affiliate member of the American Writers Museum. The Conroy Center is located at 308 Charles St. in Beaufort, and open to the public from noon to 4 p.m. Thursday through Sunday.

For more information, visit www.patconroyliterarycenter.org or call 843-379-7025.

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