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Locals helping victims of Harvey

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Photo above: Luke Fairchild, a butcher with Island’s Meat Market on Lady’s Island, stacks some of the donated items destined for flood victims in Houston. Photos by Bob Sofaly.

Angel Hayes, left, a phlebotomist with OneBlood, takes out the needle from the arm of Rett Bullard of Beaufort during a blood drive for the flood victims in Houston. Hayes said OneBlood collects blood for local hospitals but is also sending some to hospitals in Houston.
Angel Hayes, left, a phlebotomist with OneBlood, takes out the needle from the arm of Rett Bullard of Beaufort during a blood drive for the flood victims in Houston. Hayes said OneBlood collects blood for local hospitals but is also sending some to hospitals in Houston.

By Bob Sofaly and Sally Mahan

(Editor’s note: The Island News goes to press on Tuesday, so we didn’t have enough information to let our readers know what to expect regarding Hurricane Irma and its potential impact. Additionally, contact the organizations mentioned in this story before dropping off items to make sure they are still accepting donations.) 

The horror of Hurricane Harvey has brought out the best in folks throughout Northern Beaufort County.

From collections of clothing and toys to donating money to giving blood, people throughout the area are looking for ways to help.

SugarBelle, a boutique on Boundary Street, has been collecting bottled water, hygiene products and baby formula, in addition to other donations, and is working with Samaritan’s Purse to help distribute the items. 

Samaritan’s Purse is a nondenominational evangelical Christian organization providing spiritual and physical aid to hurting people around the world. Since 1970, Samaritan’s Purse has helped meet needs of people who are victims of war, poverty, natural disasters, disease and famine.

“We were helped (after Hurricane Matthew),” said Cherimie Crane Weatherford of SugarBelle. “We have to help.”

SugarBelle can be reached at 843-379-4141.

Meanwhile, Angel Hayes, a phlebotomist with OneBlood, said the organization collects blood for local hospitals but is also sending some to hospitals in Houston.

Luke Fairchild, a butcher with Island’s Meat Market on Lady’s Island, is collecting items such as baby and pet supplies, toiletries and nonperishable food for the flood victims.

Those items will be brought to Love House Ministries for storage until they are sent to Texas. Island’s Meat Market is one of the drop-off points for donations. It is accepting donations at the market at 136 Sea Island Parkway from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Call 843-525-6162.

Other donation drop-off locations include Love House Ministries at 423 Parris Island Gateway, which is accepting donations from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday (843-524-5683); and Bubba’s Lowcountry Collectibles at 463 Parris Island Gateway, which is accepting donations from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday (843-525-1130). 

Love House Ministries said they are accepting any type of toiletries, nonperishable food, clothing, water, cat and dog food, diapers, wipes, batteries, bleach, plastic gloves, trash bags, sock and underwear, blankets and sleeping bags, baby bottles and medical supplies.

Another group taking donations is Beaufort Restaurants United. 

“We are arranging to fill an 18-wheeler full of supplies to show our support for the victims of Hurricane Harvey,” according to their flyer. “Not quite a year ago we went through similar conditions and we want to give back.

“Anything you can spare will help. Clothes, water, food, blankets, anything that can help those displaced.”

Donation dropoff locations include Piace Pizza on Lady’s Island (843-379-2237), Brody’s Bar and Grill in Beaufort (843-524-2500), The Tavern in Royal Pines (843-522-9700), Boondocks on St. Helena Island (843-838-0821) and The Kitchen catering in Beaufort (843-929-8643).

Readers should check with these groups and businesses to make sure they’re still accepting donations.

Visit www.redcross.org for locations for blood drives and information on monetary donations.

Beware of fraudulent charities

In response to the devastation from Hurricane Harvey, many South Carolinians are searching for ways to help victims. 

The SC Department of Consumer Affairs is advising consumers to be on the lookout for fake charities. Here are a few tips to ensure donations get to those in need:

• Seek out a charity. Be cautious of groups that approach you. Obtain information on a particular charity by visiting the SC Secretary of State’s website at www.sos.sc.gov/Public_Charities or by calling 803-734-1790.

• Donate to well-known charities. Watch out for charities that have sprung up overnight. Do not assume a charity is legitimate based on its name. Some phony charities use names similar to those of respected, legitimate organizations.

• Know who’s calling. During a call, a professional solicitor must disclose that they are a paid solicitor, the name, location and purpose of the charity, the registered and the true name of the professional fundraising organization for which they work. 

• Know where the money is going. Ask what percentage of your contribution goes to the charitable cause. Find out their mission and history. Don’t be afraid to ask for details in writing.

• Do not provide personal or financial information to cold callers. This includes your Social Security number, credit card and bank account numbers. Scam artists can use this information to commit fraud. When in doubt, hang up.

• Do not give or send cash. For security and tax record purposes, contribute by check or credit card. Write the official name of the charity on your check.

Michael Powell, team leader for OneBlood, handles some of the 14 pints of blood taken on Sept. 1. The blood will be divided between local hospitals and hospitals in Houston.
Michael Powell, team leader for OneBlood, handles some of the 14 pints of blood taken on Sept. 1. The blood will be divided between local hospitals and hospitals in Houston.
Teresa Roberts, left, and Portia Siler sort through some of the clothing and toilet articles donated for flood victims in Houston. Roberts said they opted not to work through any national organization. They instead planned on renting a tractor-trailer and driving to Houston. The donations will then be distributed by members of their organization.
Teresa Roberts, left, and Portia Siler sort through some of the clothing and toilet articles donated for flood victims in Houston. Roberts said they opted not to work through any national organization. They instead planned on renting a tractor-trailer and driving to Houston. The donations will then be distributed by members of their organization.

Friends of the Beaufort Library to hold book sale

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Staff reports

The 2017 Friends of the Beaufort Library Fall Book Sale is right around the corner, with thousands of boxes of donated books plus audio-visual materials (books, music and movies) available at give-away prices for the annual fundraiser.  

As in years past, Henry C. Chambers Waterfront Park in downtown Beaufort will be the site of the sale, which begins Friday, Sept. 22, and runs through Sunday, Sept. 24.  

On Friday a two-hour preview for all members of The Friends will be held from 10 a.m. to noon. Nonmembers can sign up before or during the preview at the membership table for $15.   

The sale then opens to the public from noon to 6 p.m., and will reopen from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday.

Everything is half off from noon to 4 p.m. Sunday, including rare and collectible books.

The popular Silent Auction will again be conducted during this year’s book sale, with bids being accepted between 10 a.m. Friday and 3 p.m. Saturday, when bidding closes.   

Included in this year’s Silent Auction are a number of signed Pat Conroy books, a selection of natural history books on birds, gardens, freshwater fish, tropical plans, wildflowers and aquarium fish. Many similar books will also be found in the Rare & Collectible section, as well as on the Natural History, Gardening and other tables.

“This year’s Silent Auction is going to be bigger and better than ever,” according to Book Sale Chairman Kinsey Baker. “We’re getting donations daily, so it’s a good idea to look at our website for more announcements about items that will be included in the auction.

“We also have a small but charming collection of Vintage Christmas books that came in as well as a large reference library on astrology,” he said. “With more coming in every day, who knows what else might turn up between now and the end of September?”

The book sale spokesman said donations of books throughout the year have been strong and he expects to bring more than 40,000 books, CDs and DVDs to this sale.  

As always, there will be a good supply of children’s books from the greatly expanded Children’s section in the Friends’ Book Store located at the downtown Beaufort library on Scott Street, which is open year-round during library hours, with fresh stock being added regularly.

Donations of books, CDs and DVDs are needed more than ever, especially with the recent expansion of the Friends Book Store and its increased activity.

The Book Sale is the main fundraising event held by the Friends with all proceeds benefiting the Beaufort County Public Library branches in Beaufort, Lobeco and St. Helena Island.  

For more information, email FriendsBeaufort@gmail.com or visit the friendsofthebeaufortlibrary.com.

Conroy center to host award-winning author

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The Pat Conroy Literary Center’s Visiting Writers Series will host Karen Spears Zacharias, a Weatherford Award-winning, at 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 9, at Beaufort’s Technical College of the Lowcountry auditorium in Building 12. 

Zacharias, author of the new Appalachian novel “Christian Bend,” will appear in conversation with local novelist Stephanie Austin Edwards, author of “What We Set in Motion.” 

Sponsored in part by the Pulpwood Queens book club and presented in partnership with the Technical College of the Lowcountry, this Visiting Writers Series event is free and open to the public. Books will be available for sale and autographing thanks to NeverMore Books.

Spears Zacharias is a Georgia-raised Gold Star daughter. 

Her work has been featured in the New York Times and on CNN, National Public Radio and Good Morning America. 

Zacharias is the author of eight books, most recently the novels “Christian Bend” (2017), “Burdy” (2015) and “Mother of Rain” (2013) — all three published by Mercer University Press. 

“Mother of Rain” received the Weatherford Award for Best in Appalachian Fiction and was adapted for the stage by Georgia’s Historic State Theater. Zacharias and her husband divide their time between Oregon and Georgia.

A Beaufort High School classmate of Pat Conroy’s, military brat Stephanie Austin Edwards is a writing teacher, novelist and author consultant. 

Following a 22-year career in New York City working on Broadway, in film and on television, she returned to her roots in the South Carolina Lowcountry. 

“What We Set in Motion,” her debut novel, won the Best Submission Award at the Atlanta Writer’s Club Conference in 2013. 

Edwards is volunteer docent at the Pat Conroy Literary Center, where she also teaches writing workshops.

In related news, Zacharias will also teach a writing workshop as part of her Visiting Writers Series appearance. “Never Forget: A Writing Workshop for Those Who Served on the Front Lines & the Home Front” will be held from 2-3:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 9, at the Beaufort Arts Council, 921 Ribaut Road, Building 1.

Zacharias, who is also the author of “After the Flag Has Been Folded” (William Morrow) and editorial panelist for Operation Homecoming (National Endowment of the Arts), examines the storytelling methods which honor the promise to “Never Forget.”

“The stories of war need to be more than an information dump or blow-by-blow of the battles fought,” Zacharias said. 

“The obligation of those left behind is to tell the stories that bring the fallen to life. To ransom the sacred as best we can.” 

Zacharias will explore ways to tell those stories through both fiction and non-fiction. This writing workshop is open to writers at all levels of interest and experience and will be  of special benefit to those who have served — and to family members of those who have served — in the armed forces. 

This workshop is presented at, and in partnership with, the Beaufort Arts Council. The cost is $25 per person; advance registration is required at 843-379-7025, or at mneverforget.brownpapertickets.com.

Revolutionary ship model on display

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Bill-Shultz

A model of the daring ship, The South Carolina, built from scratch in 3/16-inch to 1-foot scale by Callawassie Island resident Bill Shultz, on display in the clubhouse of the Callawassie Island Club. 

In the days of “wooden ships and iron men” The South Carolina was among those rare and intrepid vessels that challenged the Royal Navy as our nation fought for independence from Britain, according to a release.  

Shultz wanted to contribute a project that is significant to South Carolina history, yet finding out what The South Carolina looked like took some detective work. 

At last, in a five-volume 1888 French compendium titled “Souvenirs de Marine” by Edmund Paris, there it was – a single one-page illustration of The South Carolina.  

Built in Amsterdam in 1777 as L’Indien, The South Carolina was a 40-gun frigate, a design intended to balance a substantial amount of firepower with greater speed than most heavily armed ships of the day.

Initially U.S. naval legend John Paul Jones tried to acquire the new ship, but British agents blocked his plans. 

But a South Carolina man found a way to put the new ship on the side of the American colonists.  

When Charleston merchant and politician Alexander Gillon was commissioned by the state to organize a navy to protect South Carolina ports, Gillon succeeded in acquiring the ship in Europe and sailing for America. 

Unable to land in Charleston, already occupied by the British, Gillon took The South Carolina to Havana, allied with the Spanish fleet there, and joined them in capturing the Bahamas from the British in 1781.  

From there Gillon sailed The South Carolina to Philadelphia to be refitted, provisioned and provided with a crew of Continental sailors. Departing Philadelphia in 1782, The South Carolina was pursued by blockading British vessels and captured.  

The fate of The South Carolina in the Revolutionary War service unfolded in just under two years – less time than it took Bill Schultz to build his model of her.  

Visit www.callawassieisland.com for more information.

Celebrating Gullah culture

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Photo above: Margaret Polite, right, looks for some help while her daughter Melissa Hardin dishes out chicken wings and a barbecue dinner plate at Grandma’s Kitchen. Photos by Bob Sofaly.

Gullah ancestry and the legacy of Reconstruction were celebrated during the Lands End Woodland River Festival on Sept. 1-2 on St. Helena Island.

In the 1920s, 45 black families got together and bought 328 acres of land. They did this so that relatives and friends would have somewhere to hunt, fish and have community gatherings. The property is also used for weddings, parties, family reunions, etc. 

To maintain the property and support its use, the heirs have been holding the Lands End Woodland Festival for the last 12 years.

Right: Anita Prather, as Aunt Pearlie Sue, entertains the crowd while spinning a tale in traditional Gullah language during the annual Lands End Woodland River Festival.

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Charlestones coming to Sea Island Presbyterian

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The Charlestones, a male quartet from Charleston, will present a concert at 4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 17, at Sea Island Presbyterian Church, 81 Lady’s Island Drive, Beaufort. The group was formed in 2014 at St. John’s Lutheran Church in Charleston, where Todd Monsell is director of music. Other members of the group are Brink Norton, William Purcell and Stephen Spaulding. The quartet has performed at many venues, including Charleston Street Music, Piccolo Spoleto, baseball games, churches and schools. The program will consist of classical, sacred, pop, patriotic and selections from the theater. All ages will be able to enjoy this performance. Donations will be appreciated. For more information, contact Charles D. Frost at 843-525-0696 or cfrost@seaislandpresbyterian.org. Photo provided.

Cooling down on Labor Day

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With the beaches at Hunting Island State Park closed due to flooding, plenty of people were looking for ways to cool off on Labor Day. Sometimes just having out at the pool with family and some inanimate friends is enough. Here, Nicole Munns keeps a watchful eye on her children, Kaitlin and Ryan, while two “action” figures seem to taking it easy as well on Labor Day at the Green Street pool. Photo by Bob Sofaly.

Community strikes back against racism

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Photo above: Beaufort Mayor Billy Keyserling, left, Pastor Theresa Roberts of Love House Ministries, Rep. Shannon Erickson, and Pastor Randy Roberts, also of Love House Ministries, raise their hands in a show of support at the Racial Harmony Bowling Event. Photos by Bob Sofaly.

By Bob Sofaly and Sally Mahan

Pastors Randy and Theresa Roberts of Love House Ministries were hoping that at least 250 people would show up for the inaugural Racial Harmony Bowling Event at the Community Bowling Center on Aug. 23.

They got more than they bargained for.

More than 1,000 folks showed up to support the organization and reject racial slurs that were spray painted on one of the center’s exterior walls on Aug. 19.

Randy Roberts said the graffiti was removed with the help of local officials.

“Thank you to the Beaufort city mayor, city manager, fire chief and firefighters for your support in removing the graffiti off the wall so rapidly,” he wrote on Aug. 21 on Love House Ministries’ Facebook page.

After the graffiti was removed, Randy and Theresa Roberts wanted to bring the community together, so they decided to hold a free Racial Harmony Bowling Event at the bowling center on Ribaut Road.

“This is in direct response to the racist graffiti on our wall,” Roberts said. “We wanted to show our community that ‘Love is Beaufort Strong.’ ”

About 20 other churches throughout the community contributed to make the bowling event a success.

“One church contacted me and is bringing hot dogs and burgers, another is bringing freeze pops, another soda, another donation boxes, another a bounce house – and from all different denominations,” Roberts said before the event took place.

In addition to community members, many elected officials also attended the bowling event.

State Rep. Shannon Erickson, R-Beaufort, said, “We have a choice: We let the negative define us or we turn that negativity into happiness.”

Happiness and fellowship won the day.

“There is no place for that (racist graffiti) in our community,” one person said. “Not in our town.”

Meanwhile, a 52-year-old Beaufort man was arrested and charged with writing the racist phrases at Love House Ministries and the former Shell station, both on Ribaut Road in Beaufort.

Jason Lyman was held on a $5,000 bond for each of two counts of illegal graffiti. He paid his bond and has been released from the Beaufort County Detention Center.

Bryce Young, 8, looks like a pro bowler as he releases his ball during the inaugural Racial Harmony Bowling Event on Aug. 23. The event, according to Pastor Randy Roberts of Love House Ministries, was a direct result of racist graffiti spray painted on an exterior wall of their bowling alley on Aug. 19.
Bryce Young, 8, looks like a pro bowler as he releases his ball during the inaugural Racial Harmony Bowling Event on Aug. 23. The event, according to Pastor Randy Roberts of Love House Ministries, was a direct result of racist graffiti spray painted on an exterior wall of their bowling alley on Aug. 19.
Volunteers feed some of the more than 1,000 people that showed up for the inaugural Racial Harmony Bowling Event at the Love House Ministries Community Bowling Center on Ribaut Road. The event was in direct response by the community in opposition to recent racially charged graffiti sprayed on the exterior wall at right.
Volunteers feed some of the more than 1,000 people that showed up for the inaugural Racial Harmony Bowling Event at the Love House Ministries Community Bowling Center on Ribaut Road. The event was in direct response by the community in opposition to recent racially charged graffiti sprayed on the exterior wall at right.

Couple kicks it up at Y for better health

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Photo above: Ken and Kelly Seremak are shown here before and after their efforts to lose weight and get healthy with the help of the YMCA. Photos provided.

Staff reports

Ken and Kelly Seremak have been members of the Wardle YMCA in Port Royal for several years, but a visit to the doctor late last year was the trigger Ken needed to really utilize their memberships and get moving at the Y. With encouragement from wife Kelly, better eating habits and the assistance of Y personal trainer Jeff Lewis, Ken has transformed his health for the better.

In a recent “My Y” story, Ken said, “Most people don’t give much attention to health and nutrition until something goes wrong or it doesn’t feel good. Just like many others, my wife Kelly and I were the same way, and had our share of health issues also. 

“Kelly has suffered with many allergies that have forced her to restrict her diet and become a pescetarian (a vegetarian who also eats fish). I have had issues with high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes. We both have been overweight most of our lives.”

In December 2016, Ken’s doctor told him that his diabetes was “out of control” and he recommended he start taking insulin immediately. Like most people, he became very concerned. 

After relaying the diagnosis to Kelly, she recommended that they start exercising together, modify both their diets and get healthy.

“We have been members at the YMCA for many years, but I was not a faithful attendee,” Ken said. “While we were both active people when we were younger — Kelly is now 47 and I am 55 — neither of us were consistent with our total wellness.” 

The Seremaks moved to the Beaufort area 15 years ago and are originally from Chicago. Kelly said, “I’m ‘retired’ from being a homeschool mom for our four children, two boys and two girls.” 

Ken is the area sales rep for Atlanta Dental Supply and as a couple they are active with church ministries at Calvary Baptist Church and their four children now have five boys between them, making the Seremak’s busy grandparents.

While Kelly attended various classes at the Y throughout the years including swimming, yoga and group exercise classes, even an intense kickboxing class, last summer she hurt her ankle and took to the pool for some of the classes offered there. However, she then injured her shoulder and was not able to swim any longer, so she “discovered” the kickboxing class with Jeff Lewis and really liked it.

“I was able to share my health concerns with Jeff and he offered many good recommendations, including stretches and exercises, even cryotherapy,” she said.

Lewis has been a personal trainer and group exercise instructor at the YMCA for four years. He is also a retired Marine Corps drill instruction – and that passion for motivating others shines through during his classes and in encouraging others in sustaining a healthy lifestyle.  

Ken started coming back to the Y to get healthy. He walked on the treadmill while Kelly attended the classes. By late January he started to attend the fitness classes also, especially the ones that Lewis was instructing. 

“Jeff really pushes the class so we each get the most of it,” said Ken. “His knowledge in health and nutrition, and his desire to motivate the class (‘The Family’, as Jeff would say!) has helped us so much.”

Now, after six months, Kelly and Ken have lost well over 100 pounds collectively. After re-visiting the doctor, Ken is medication free. His blood pressure, cholesterol and diabetes numbers are all back in the normal range. 

“People ask us how we did it and all we can say is the old-fashioned way … through diet and exercise,” said Ken. “We are very happy we started to be more faithful to the YMCA and many people there have helped get us on the right path. I want to give a special thanks to Jeff Lewis for always taking the time to discuss issues with us and to offer encouragement along the way.”

The YMCA of Beaufort County is part of a 172-year old worldwide organization that enables the citizens of Beaufort County to develop values and behaviors that are consistent with its mission: To put Christian principles into practice through programs that build a healthy spirit, mind and body for all. The Wardle Family YMCA of Beaufort County was charted in 1990 and opened its doors in June 1996 in Port Royal.

Visit ymcabeaufortcounty.com.

Interested in getting back on a path to better health after a long hiatus? YMCA Wellness Director Denice Davis Fanning shares some tips to get you started:

If possible have a fitness assessment by a doctor or wellness coach.

List your goals. Are your goals realistic?

What type of exercise do you like? Make a fitness plan around what you like.

Try joining a group exercise class. You will make friends and feel encouraged to not miss the class.

Remember fitness can be really fun and it also relieves the stresses of daily life. Not to mention all of the health benefits you gain from exercise.

Conroy Literary Festival coming to Beaufort

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Photo above: The Conroy Literary Center is at 308 Charles St. in Beaufort. Photo provided.

Staff reports

Extending the experiences which began at the Pat Conroy at 70 festival and birthday celebration in October 2015, the annual Pat Conroy Literary Festival continues to honor the writing life of Pat Conroy (1945–2016) in his adopted hometown of Beaufort. 

Now the signature annual event of the Pat Conroy Literary Center, the festival embraces themes from Pat Conroy’s work and expands the conversation to include larger discussions of literature, life and culture. 

Taking the Transformative Power of Education as its theme, the second annual Conroy Festival will honor Conroy as student, teacher and mentor through an immersive weekend of writer panels, readings, signings, workshops, tours, film screenings, live performances, receptions, a children’s book fair and other special events.

This event is being presented in partnership with the University of South Carolina Beaufort’s Center for the Arts in historic downtown Beaufort. 

“Through the character of Tom Wingo in ‘The Prince of Tides,’ Pat wrote that there was ‘no word in the language I revere more than teacher,’ and this year’s festival is our opportunity to honor some of those teachers who meant so much to Pat, to celebrate Pat’s own role as a teacher and student in and well beyond the classroom, and to reflect on the many ways in which education shapes and reshapes all of our lives,” said Jonathan Haupt, the Conroy Center’s executive director and the founding director of the annual Conroy Festival. 

“Writing was an act of teaching for Pat, and teaching for him was always an act of love — of great love. Our festival will honor that aspect of Pat in the stories we share this year.”   

Festival highlights include a tour of the former Beaufort High School where Conroy was a student and teacher; a screening of “The Lords of Discipline” followed by a panel discussion with some of his Citadel Class of ’67 classmates; a performance of the musical “Conrack”; an exhibition of photographs by Billy and Paul Keyserling documenting Conroy’s Daufuskie Island teaching experience; the debut of a new short film by Luke Parker Bowles about the Conroy Center; and appearances by Conroy’s teachers William E. Dufford and Nathalie Dupree, his students Sallie Ann Robinson and Valerie Sayers, his widow and fellow novelist Cassandra King Conroy, his brother Tim Conroy and daughter Melissa Conroy.  

The festival will also include the launch of the paperback edition of “A Lowcountry Heart,” the posthumously published collection of short nonfiction by Pat Conroy; of “Geographies of Terrain,” the first book of poetry from Conroy’s brother Tim, a retired special education teacher; and of “My Tour through the Asylum: A Southern Integrationist’s Memoir” by William E. Dufford, Conroy’s Beaufort High School principal and a force for positive change in integration and diversity education in South Carolina.  

The pantheon of teaching writers, poets and other special guests will also include International African American Museum president and Robert Smalls descendant Michael Boulware Moore, Smalls biographer Cate Lineberry, award-winning filmmaker and human rights advocate Bud Ferillo, prolific and award winning artist Wendell Minor, celebrated chefs the Lee Bros., and Sue Monk Kidd’s daughter Ann Kidd Taylor, now a novelist in her own right.    

Visit the Pat Conroy Literary Festival’s new website for a wealth of information about the weekend’s schedule, presenters, ticket options, sponsors, travel recommendations, and select free events on Thursday and Sunday of the festival weekend: www.patconroyliteraryfestival.org. 

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Literary Center earns national designation

The Pat Conroy Literary Center has been newly selected as an affiliate of the American Writers Museum, the first site in South Carolina to receive this national designation.

“For our Conroy Center to be approved as an AWM affiliate on the basis of our first year’s worth of public programming and operations speaks volumes about all that we are doing here in Beaufort and beyond to continue Pat Conroy’s literary legacy.” said Conroy Center executive director Jonathan Haupt. 

“It’s a tremendous honor for everyone who supports the Conroy Center. And we’re in good company with the constellation of our fellow AWM affiliates across the country.”

The American Writers Museum Affiliates Program fosters collaboration among American author museums and homes to increase interest in the works of great American writers and to expand the public knowledge and appreciation for their unique contributions to our nation. To date, just over 70 sites nationwide have been selected for AWM affiliate status.

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